Albert Leopold Vitter, Jr.

Albert Leopold Vitter, Jr.

Male 1915 - 2003  (87 years)
Person ID: I15155 


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  • Name Albert Leopold Vitter  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    Suffix Jr. 
    Name A. L. and Père  [11
    Notes 
    • Obituary
      Albert Leopold Vitter Jr., a lifelong resident of New Orleans, LA, died Friday October 17, 2003 at his home at the age of 87. Mr. Vitter attended St. Matthias Catholic School and graduated from Holy Cross High School. He was a 1935 electrical engineering graduate of the University of Notre Dame, where he also received a masters degree in physics and served on the faculty. He first worked for the State of Louisiana in the Department of Conservation. During World War II, Mr. Vitter was engaged by the United States Government's Office for Scientific Research and Development at MIT's Radiation Laboratory and also as an instructor at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. He was later employed by Chevron Oil Company as Chief Engineer until his retirement in 1981. Mr. Vitter was a tireless volunteer in the community, performing computer analysis for VIA (Volunteer Information Agency), St. Rita Parish, and the St. Vincent dePaul Society. He was a benefactor of the University of Notre Dame. For his outstanding dedication to the Catholic Church, the Archdiocese of New Orleans honored him with the Order of St. Louis IX Medallion.

      "One of my father's defining qualities was the combination of intelligence, hard work, and thoroughness that he brought to bear on everything he did," said his son Al Vitter III.

      He is survived by his wife of 60 years Audrey St. Raymond Vitter; four sons Albert L. Vitter III and J. Mark Vitter of New Orleans, Jeffrey S. Vitter of West Lafayette, Indiana, and David B. Vitter of Metairie, Louisiana; two daughters Martha (Tootie) Vitter Jackoniski of Alpharetta, Georgia and Donna Vitter of Paris, France; and 15 grandchildren.

      Preceding a Mass on Tuesday, October 21 at 11 a.m. at St. Rita of Cascia Church, 2729 Lowerline St. in New Orleans, there was a visitation at Tharp-Sontheimer-Tharp Funeral Home at 4127 S. Claiborne Avenue from 9 a.m. Donations to the American Parkinson Disease Association Inc. (1250 Hylan Blvd. Suite 4B, Staten Island, NY 10305-1946, 1-800-223-2732, www.apdaparkinson.org) are appreciated.
      *********************************************************************************

      Go to the Genealogy subpage at vitter.org/Genealogy to see a slideshow on A. L. Vitter Jr's life.

      A. L. Vitter, Jr., known as Papa or Poppa to his children and then as Père to his grandchildren, was an only child; his older sister died at birth. He and his mother, whom her grandchildren called Mère, crossed the Atlantic aboard the S. S. Rochambeau on May 14-24, 1921 when he was 5 1/2 years old. They returned on the S. S. Paris on August 6-13, 1921. They visited Toulouse, Lourdes, Noe (on the Garonne River), Vichy, Rheims, Battlefield of Berry au Bac. He has a picture of him and his mother in Toulouse on July 4, 1921. Père's father A. L. Vitter, Sr. was known as Baba. Baba joined them on the return from France and they visited Niagara Falls along with Herman Bohne.

      Père graduated from Notre Dame in Electrical Engineering 1935 at the age of 19 and earned his Master's degree in Physics two years later. He taught on the Engineering faculty at Notre Dame from 1937–1938, but then decided to return home, where he became senior petroleum engineer for the Louisiana Department of Conservation. He worked during WWII in the Radiation Lab at MIT, specializing on sonar research. He married Audrey St. Raymond (known to grandkids as Mimi) on June 19, 1943. His family at 3600 Napoleon Avenue lived cattycorner to the St. Raymonds at 3539 Napoleon Avenue. Al III was born in February 1945 in Boston while Père and Mimi lived in a dorm on Mass Ave on the MIT campus (Bexley Hall). There is a picture with Mimi holding Al III as a baby on her lap in 1945 in front of their residence, which was recreated in another photo as a joke 19 years later when Al III was a college student at Notre Dame. The pictures are included in the slide show in honor of Père, available on the web site http://www.vitter.org

      Père started work at the California Company of the Standard Oil Company of California (now Chevron) and was appointed Chief Engineer in the 1950s. He had several honors and patents during the years. He retired in December 1980 and turned his pursuits to computers and volunteer work. He won, along with Mimi on separate occasions, the Order of St. Louis Medallion, the highest award bestowed on lay people in the archdiocese of New Orleans.

      In his eulogy, Al Vitter III offered this assessment of Père: "One of my father's defining qualities was the combination of intelligence, hard work, and thoroughness that he brought to bear on everything he did."

      Each Saturday morning for several years, Père played golf (in a manner of speaking) with his brother-in-law John (Buddie) St. Raymond and occasionally joined by Mark or Jeff if they could get up that early. Tee time was always well before 7 am. Père was known for his patented banana slice, which can be seen on the family video taken at the Gulf Hills Dude Ranch in Ocean Springs, MS in the mid-late 1960s. He took up tennis when he heard that a slice in tennis was good. He had a knack of getting match-ending charlie horses in his leg whenever he would go into the lead when playing tennis with Jeff.

      Père did a lot of carpentry as a hobby, building much of the furniture and gadgets in the house at 4100 Vincennes, such as the desk in the green bedroom and the intercom system. He was very talented in building and designing. He designed a system for developing the photos for the annual Vitter Christmas photo card, a tradition started in December 1945 and still carried on by Jeff's family. In the 1960s he designed and installed the underground sprinker system around the house, later supplemented by Jeff in 1978. He accidentally cut off the very tip of his little finger one day while using one of his many power saws and drills. He was always kidded for one of the projects he never got around to: the infamous garage doors, which for about 40 years graced the "rough part of the basement" (the name for the unfinished storage area on the first floor) until Hurricane Katrina.

      Jeff remembers when Baba died (shortly after Mère passed) and Père went through the house. They had a huge metal safe in their house (Baba ran a bank), and Père didn't have the combination written, but he had known it as a child. Amazingly enough, after searching his memory, he was able to open the safe.

      Père died two years before Hurricane Katrina. Tootie evacuated Mimi to Atlanta for the hurricane, and she passed away in Atlanta six weeks later.
    Born 23 Dec 1915  New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 15
    Gender Male 
    Died 17 Oct 2003  New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 11, 12, 15
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    Buried 21 Oct 2003  Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home & Cemeteries, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 11, 12
    • section 5, Artigues-Vitter tomb,
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    Siblings
     1. Berthe Vitter (ID:I1077),   b. 17 Jan 1914, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1914

    Parents

    Family ID: F5 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father Albert Leopold Vitter, Sr. (ID:I13),   b. 15 Sep 1878, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Apr 1961, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Mother Marie Berthe Artigues (ID:I14),   b. 4 Jul 1886, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Sep 1960, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Married 11 Dec 1912  St. John the Baptist Catholic Church (with pointy gold dome), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [30, 31, 32
    Reference Number 1487 

    Family

    Family ID: F5296  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Wife Audrey Malvina St. Raymond (ID:I16565),   b. 20 Dec 1920, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Oct 2005, Atlanta, De Kalb, Georgia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 19 Jun 1943  St. Matthias Catholic Church, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 33
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding Day
    Reference Number 1474 
    Children 
      1. Dr. Albert Leopold Vitter, III (ID:I8)
      2. Martha Louise Vitter (ID:I9)
      3. Donna Vitter (ID:I10)
      4. John Mark Vitter, MD (ID:I11)
      5. Dr. Jeffrey Scott Vitter (ID:I1785),   b. 13 Nov 1955, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
      6. U. S. Senator David Bruce Vitter (ID:I12)

    Other Personal Events

    Baptism 1916  St. John the Baptist Catholic Church (with pointy gold dome), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Godparents ? and Odile Maurin 
    Education Between 1927 and 1931  Holy Cross High School, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (middle of second row) as starting forward on Holy Cross basketball team
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. with Holy Cross carpool
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (fourth from right in middle row) as star quarterback on 1930 Holy Cross football team.
    Education 1935  University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, St Joseph, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    B.S., Engineering, graduated 8th in his class at ND 
    U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Document
    U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1990 Document
    Pere at Notre Dame
    Pere at ND Alumni Hall
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with some fellow engineering students.  (Those wacky college students!)
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with fellow students.
    ALV Jr.
    Education 1937  [11
    M.S., Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 
    Arrival Between 23 Aug and 3 Sep 1947  New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Caribbean cruise on the ship Antigua 
    Arrival 13 Aug 1921  New York Port, New York, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 11
    return from France trip by mother and son on board ship Le Havre 
    Mere and AL in Toulouse, France
    Mere and AL in Toulouse, France
    A.L. Vitter Jr. and his mother Berthe Artigues Vitter (Mère) in Toulouse, France in 1921
    Award Abt 1995  Archdiocese of New Orleans, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    the Order of St. Louis IX Medallion presented to A.L. Vitter Jr. for his outstanding dedication to the Catholic Church 
    Pere receiving St. Louis Medal
    Pere receiving St. Louis Medal
    Departure 1921  Le Havre, Manche, Basse-Normandie, France Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 11
    Mere and AL in Toulouse, France
    Mere and AL in Toulouse, France
    A.L. Vitter Jr. and his mother Berthe Artigues Vitter (Mère) in Toulouse, France in 1921
    Description Brown hair, blue eyes  [11
    Event Between 1959 and 2003  New Orleans Country Club, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [22
    Member; A.L. was named appellant in group suit against the government protesting tax on membership dues/stock 
    Event May 1981  Europe: England and France Find all individuals with events at this location  [10, 17, 23, 24, 25
    trip by A.L. & Audrey St. Raymond Vitter Jr. to visit Al Vitter III on sabbatical in England and Donna Vitter in France 
    Event 21 Mar 1987  4801 Avron Boulevard, Metairie, Jefferson, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [16, 26, 27
    Rex was kidnapped by college students during the night of March 20–21 and left on the Metairie lawn of the Staub family 
    Occupation Between 1937 and 1938  University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, St Joseph, Indiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Instructor, Department of Electrical Engineering 
    Pere decides to return to Louisiana, 1938 Document
    ND job offer letter, 1937 Document
    Pere, graduate work and instructor at ND Document
    Occupation Between 1938 and 1942  Louisiana Department of Conservation, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Senior petroleum engineer 
    Pere decides to return to Louisiana, 1938 Document
    1942-03-26 -- AL Vitter Jr
    A.L.Vitter, Oilman, 1940
    Occupation Between 1942 and 1945  Harvard University, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 28
    instructor 
    U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Document
    1942-03-26 -- AL Vitter Jr
    Occupation Between 1942 and 1945  U.S. Office for Scientific Research and Development, MIT Radiation Laboratory, Group 52, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    researcher 
    Pere at M.I.T. Radiation Lab
    1942-03-26 -- AL Vitter Jr
    Occupation Between 1950 and 1981  Chevron Oil Company (Standard Oil Company of California), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 11
    Engineer and Chief Engineer 
    Reference Number
    Residence Between 1915 and 1923  1528 Baronne Street (corner Terpsichore), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 29
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Mere, Baba, and Pere on Rex
    Pere's childhood Baronne Street house
    Pere walking with Baba and Rex
    Residence Between 1923 and 1925  3800 Napoleon Avenue, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [29
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Residence Between 1925 and 1937  3600 Napoleon Avenue (newly constructed house) 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 29
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Mimi taming Rex at 3600 Napoleon
    Mimi, Pere, Mere, & Baba on the front porch at 3600 Napoleon
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with some fellow engineering students.  (Those wacky college students!)
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with fellow students.
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (middle of second row) as starting forward on Holy Cross basketball team
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. with Holy Cross carpool
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (fourth from right in middle row) as star quarterback on 1930 Holy Cross football team.
    3600 Napoleon Ave New Orleans LA
    Residence Between 1942 and 1945  Bexley Hall, Apt. 402, MIT, Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Baby Al with Pere
    Residence 1945  3600 Napoleon Avenue (newly constructed house) 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [28, 29
    Residence Between 1946 and 1957  4120 General Pershing Street 70125, near Broad Street, Broadmoor, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 8
    Residence Between 1957 and 2003  4100 Vincennes Place 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 26, 27, 29
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Times-Picayune Rex kidnapping, March 23, 1987 Document
    Audrey St Raymond with sailor Jeff
    Jeff's Robot Commando Christmas present (his all-time favorite)
    1983 Christmas 4100 Vincennes
    Rex with Pere, Mimi, Jason, & Joli
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Queenie With Katrina Watermark
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1915 and 1923 - 1528 Baronne Street (corner Terpsichore), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 23 Dec 1915 - New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptism - 1916 - St. John the Baptist Catholic Church (with pointy gold dome), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDeparture - 1921 - Le Havre, Manche, Basse-Normandie, France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsArrival - 13 Aug 1921 - New York Port, New York, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1923 and 1925 - 3800 Napoleon Avenue, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1925 and 1937 - 3600 Napoleon Avenue (newly constructed house) 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - Between 1927 and 1931 - Holy Cross High School, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEducation - 1935 - University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, St Joseph, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Between 1937 and 1938 - University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, St Joseph, Indiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Between 1938 and 1942 - Louisiana Department of Conservation, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Between 1942 and 1945 - Harvard University, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Between 1942 and 1945 - U.S. Office for Scientific Research and Development, MIT Radiation Laboratory, Group 52, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1942 and 1945 - Bexley Hall, Apt. 402, MIT, Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 19 Jun 1943 - St. Matthias Catholic Church, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1945 - 3600 Napoleon Avenue (newly constructed house) 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1946 and 1957 - 4120 General Pershing Street 70125, near Broad Street, Broadmoor, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Between 1950 and 1981 - Chevron Oil Company (Standard Oil Company of California), New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Between 1957 and 2003 - 4100 Vincennes Place 70125, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEvent - Between 1959 and 2003 - New Orleans Country Club, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEvent - May 1981 - Europe: England and France Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsEvent - 21 Mar 1987 - 4801 Avron Boulevard, Metairie, Jefferson, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsAward - Abt 1995 - Archdiocese of New Orleans, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 17 Oct 2003 - New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 21 Oct 2003 - Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home & Cemeteries, New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsArrival - Between 23 Aug and 3 Sep 1947 - New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
  • Photos
    Audrey St Raymond with sailor Jeff
    Jeff's Robot Commando Christmas present (his all-time favorite)
    1983 Christmas 4100 Vincennes
    St. Raymond and Vitter families in side yard of 3539 Napoleon Avenue
    Weekly dinner, 3539 Napoleon Avenue
    1916-17  Wilmer Todd AL Vitter Jr Lewis Jr Todd, and possibly Sydney Vitter
    1916-17 Lewis Todd AL Vitter Jr and Gretchen Vitter
    Lewis Todd, Gretchen Vitter, and A.L. Vitter Jr.
    Mere, Baba, and Pere on Rex
    Pere's childhood Baronne Street house
    Pere walking with Baba and Rex
    Mere and AL in Toulouse, France
    Rex with Pere, Mimi, Jason, & Joli
    Mimi & Pere 0n Antigua Cruise, 1947
    Mimi & Pere's 40 Anniversary reception at the N.O. Country Club
    Jeff & Sharon'a Wedding Christmas photo
    Pere receiving St. Louis Medal
    Mimi & Pere swimming before Pere dunks Mimi
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding
    Jeff & Sharon's Wedding
    Mimi taming Rex at 3600 Napoleon
    Mimi and Pere in Cuba, 1947
    Pere at M.I.T. Radiation Lab
    Mimi & Pere at the Ferran Farm in Uzan
    NY World's Fair with Tawo
    SF Seal Rock on a windy day with Mimi, Pere, Sharon, & Jillian, 1986
    Jeff's ND graduation, 1977
    Mimi & Pere at Sea Island, Georgia
    Mimi, Pere, Mere, & Baba on the front porch at 3600 Napoleon
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Hurricane Katrina aftermath: 4100 Vincennes Place
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding
    Mimi & Pere's Wedding Day
    Pere at Notre Dame
    Pere at ND Alumni Hall
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with some fellow engineering students.  (Those wacky college students!)
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Notre Dame with fellow students.
    ALV Jr.
    Baby Al with Pere
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. at Holy Cross
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (middle of second row) as starting forward on Holy Cross basketball team
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. with Holy Cross carpool
    A.L. Vitter, Jr. (fourth from right in middle row) as star quarterback on 1930 Holy Cross football team.
    A.L. Vitter, Jr.
    Pere's patented slice
    1942-03-26 -- AL Vitter Jr
    On Rex at 1528 Baronne
    On Rex at 1528 Baronne
    Rex kidnapped in Metairie
    A.L.Vitter, Oilman, 1940
    Pere on Queen at 3800 Napoleon circa 1924
    Queenie With Katrina Watermark
    3600 Napoleon Ave New Orleans LA
    Uzan Monument
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    Documents At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Document
    U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Document
    Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter Wedding Announcement, newspaper from 1943 Document
    Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter Wedding Announcement, newspaper from 1943 Document
    Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter wedding announcement from, 27 Jun 1943.
    1942 WWII Draft Registration Card, Albert Leopold Vitter Document
    1942 WWII Draft Registration Card, Albert Leopold Vitter Document
    1942 WWII Draft Registration Card, Albert Leopold Vitter
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    2003-10-21 -- Albert L. VItter, Jr. Mass of Christian Burial Document
    Times-Picayune Rex kidnapping, March 23, 1987 Document
    Times-Picayune Rex kidnapping, March 23, 1987 Document
    Times-Picayune Rex Reward Notice, March 22, 1987 Document
    Times-Picayune Rex Reward Notice, March 22, 1987 Document
    Pere decides to return to Louisiana, 1938 Document
    Pere decides to return to Louisiana, 1938 Document
    ND job offer letter, 1937 Document
    ND job offer letter, 1937 Document
    Pere, graduate work and instructor at ND Document
    Pere, graduate work and instructor at ND Document
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    1920 United States Federal Census
    1920 United States Federal Census
    Year: 1920; Census Place: New Orleans Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: T625_618; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 9
    1930 United States Federal Census
    1930 United States Federal Census
    Year: 1930; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0214; FHL microfilm: 2340545
    1940 United States Federal Census
    1940 United States Federal Census
    Year: 1940; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: m-t0627-01432; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 36-375
    New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Document
    New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Document
    Year: 1921; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 3008; Line: 2; Page Number: 31
    Headstones
    Artigues Vitter tomb Headstone
    Artigues Vitter tomb Headstone
    Ferreol Artigues-Berthe Vitter tomb Headstone
    Ferreol Artigues-Berthe Vitter tomb Headstone
    Albert L. Vitter (1915-2003,) Audrey St Raymond Vitter (1920-2005.) Burial: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA. Plot: Section 5 - Artigues - Vitter tomb.
    Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA Headstone
    Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA Headstone
    Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA
    Histories
    A. L. & Audrey Vitter: Role Models Extraordinaires
    A. L. & Audrey Vitter: Role Models Extraordinaires
    Jeff Vitter's parents A. L. Jr. & Audrey (née St. Raymond) Vitter (grandparent names Père and Mimi) led accomplished lives of extraordinary service and caring for others — a legacy for generations to follow (including many Domers and a killer cookbook!).
    Albert Artigues Jr. & All That Jazz
    Albert Artigues Jr. & All That Jazz
    For the middle part of the 20th century, Albert Artigues Jr. and his cornet were mainstays in the New Orleans jazz scene at night, while he worked at the family business during the days.
    Après le <em>Aha!</em> moment (et avant aussi!)
    Après le Aha! moment (et avant aussi!)
    As highlighted in the history "The Aha! Moment That Led to This Website," Jeff Vitter made a big breakthrough in December 2000 when he discovered when, where, and how his Vitter ancestors came from Europe to the USA. Much correspondence behind the scenes led up to and beyond that discovery, including new information about Jeff's mom's side of the family in southwest France around Uzan (pronounced "u-ZHANG" in the local patois) and Anères. This history gives an inside look at the correspondences that genealogists engage in and how what we understand grows (we hope!) with time.
    Artigues Family Notes and Open Questions
    Artigues Family Notes and Open Questions
    A. L. Vitter Jr. had Artigues connections on both sides of his family: his mother (Marie) Berthe (née Artigues) Vitter was the daughter of immigrant Ferréol Jean Marie Artigues, and his 1st cousin 2x removed Marie Louise Cathalongne (daughter of 1843 Clerval immigrant Marie Louise Vitter) married immigrant Jean Ferréol "John" Artigues. Ferréol and John were 1st cousins. This history includes records about the Artigues, including several who we think are related to us but we haven't yet shown.
    Our Loyal Guardians Rex & Queenie
    Our Loyal Guardians Rex & Queenie
    Rex and Queenie — half-ton cast-iron Newfoundland dogs — have stood guard over Vitter-Artigues homes in New Orleans for about 110 years and have a fascinating (and still mysterious) genealogy of their own.
    Relativity Research
    Relativity Research
    The underlying theme of our website is research on relativity — our relatives pulsate outward in our time-space continuum in a series of gravitational waves spanning many generations and relationships! This page gives an overview of several family histories, beginning with Jeff Vitter's Aha! moment, which ultimately led to creation of this website.
    The <em>Aha!</em> Moment That Led to This Website
    The Aha! Moment That Led to This Website
    When Jeff Vitter was growing up in New Orleans, his parents A. L. Vitter Jr. and Audrey (née St. Raymond) Vitter would always tell the family about their trips to France as young children to meet relatives, but they didn't know many particulars beyond their grandparents, especially on my dad's paternal side. Jeff's Aha! moment came when he combined technologies — new and old — to discover how, when, and where the Vitters came to the USA from Europe.
    Three Vitters of the French Resistance
    Three Vitters of the French Resistance
    World War II saw France divided and conquered by Hitler's Third Reich, and Louis, Roger, and Pierre Vitter went underground to fight as part of the Resistance.
    Vitter Holiday Cards Through the Years
    Vitter Holiday Cards Through the Years
    'Tis the Season to be jolly! Welcome to a tradition starting in 1945 spanning several generations of annual Christmas greeting cards, augmented from time to time with cards for other occasions.
    Articles
    <em>Thursday Night Cookin': Mimi's Recipes for a Happy Home</em>
    Thursday Night Cookin': Mimi's Recipes for a Happy Home
    Judge Wendy Vitter put together a wonderful cook book in honor of Mimi's 78th birthday in 1998, entitled Thursday Night Cookin': Mimi's Recipes for a Happy Home. The cook book consists of the family's favorite recipes of Mimi's, along with several bons mots, family trivia, and memories. The name for the cook book came from the family's tradition of having dinner each Thursday night at the New Orleans home of Mimi & Père.

    When the Vitter kids were younger, a similar tradition existed at Mimi's parents' home at 3539 Napoleon, where Mémère and Pépère would host everyone to Wednesday night dinner, often roast chicken. Jeff liked to make little chicken sandwiches with the chicken, biscuits, and gravy, and Pépère would often make his patented goulash with all the dishes on the table mixed together. We hope you enjoy the recipes and reminiscences as well!
    Genealogy Charts
    Ancestors of Jeffrey S. Vitter
    Ancestors of Jeffrey S. Vitter
    Jeff Vitter is co-host of this website vitter.org, and this chart traces his ancestors, generation by generation.
    Descendants of Simon Wider (1667–1737) and Ursula Wick (born circa 1670) and Anna Maria Schietknecht (born 1678)
    Descendants of Simon Wider (1667–1737) and Ursula Wick (born circa 1670) and Anna Maria Schietknecht (born 1678)
    Simon Wider (1667–1737) is a 7th great grandfather of Jeffrey S. Vitter, co-host of this website vitter.org. Simon lived in Bietingen, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (near the eastern border of Schaffhouse, Switzerland). His great grandson Hérard Vitter (1772–1848, born Erhardus Wider) immigrated roughly 150 miles west to Clerval, France from Bietingen in 1799. Hérard's son Pierre Vitter (1803–1846) immigrated to New Orleans, Louisiana via Le Havre, France with his family in 1843. Their histories are on the Relativity Research page of the website.
    Notes of Jean Jacques Artigues and Blanche Artigues Johnson
    Notes of Jean Jacques Artigues and Blanche Artigues Johnson
    Email and FAX by Bert F. Artigues to Jeff Vitter, 19–20 April 2004. Typed notes by Jean Jacques Artigues with handwritten notations by Blanche Artigues Johnson. Later annotations on contents by vitter.org website co-host Jeff Vitter.
    Descendants of Claude Courtot (born 1624) and Claudine Vincent (born 1627)
    Descendants of Claude Courtot (born 1624) and Claudine Vincent (born 1627)
    Claude Courtot and Claudine Vincent are 9th great grandparents of Jeff Vitter, co-host of this website vitter.org. Claude were born in Aillevanas and Claudine was born in nearby Montjustin-et-Velotte in the Haute-Saône department of Franche-Comté, France.
    Descendants of Bernard Artigues and Bernarde Perissé (last half of 1600s) of Salies-du-Salat, Haute-Garonne, France
    Descendants of Bernard Artigues and Bernarde Perissé (last half of 1600s) of Salies-du-Salat, Haute-Garonne, France
    Bernard Artigues (last half of 1600s) is a 7th great grandfather of Jeffrey S. Vitter, co-host of this website vitter org. Bernard married Bernarde Perissé from Mane, Haute-Garonne, France in 1687 in Salies-du-Salat, Haute-Garonne, France. Their 4th great grandson Ferréol Artigues (1852–1914) immigrated to New Orleans, Louisiana from Salies-du-Salat in 1870. Several other descendants immigrated to New Orleans as well, and there are many Artigues and other descendants living in New Orleans today.
    Descendants of Hugues Lambelin (1573–1677) and Marguerite Bernard (1618–1684)
    Descendants of Hugues Lambelin (1573–1677) and Marguerite Bernard (1618–1684)
    Hugues Lambelin and Marguerite Bernard are vitter.org website co-host Jeff Vitter's 9th great grandparents from the Haute-Saône region of eastern France. Hugues was born in Adelans-et-le-Val-de-Bithaine, and Marguerite was born in Montjustin and died in Luxeuil-les-Bains.
    Descendants of Thiébaud Oval (1692–1772) and Anne Lambelin (1710–1788)
    Descendants of Thiébaud Oval (1692–1772) and Anne Lambelin (1710–1788)
    Thiébaud Oval and Anne Lambelin are vitter.org website co-host Jeff Vitter's 6th great grandparents from the Haute-Saône department of Franche-Comté, France. Anne was born in Aillevans, and they both died in nearby Borey.
    Descendants of Guillaume Simonin (Symonin) dit Le Grand Claudot (circa 1520–1584)
    Descendants of Guillaume Simonin (Symonin) dit Le Grand Claudot (circa 1520–1584)
    Guillaume Simonin (Symonin) is the 11th great grandfather of Jeff Vitter, co-host of this website vitter.org. Guillaume Simonin lived in Vaudrivillers in the Doubs department of Franche-Comté, France.
    Descendants of Charlemagne, Holy Roman Emperor (748–814 AD)
    Descendants of Charlemagne, Holy Roman Emperor (748–814 AD)
    Co-host Jeff Vitter of the website vitter.org is a 39th great grandson of Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne de Herstal. You can read a history of Charlemagne on the main webpage vitter.org/familytree.

  • Source Citations

    1. [S1251] Find A Grave.
      Record for Albert Leopold Vitter Sr
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/80331940
      Artigues Vitter tomb Headstone
      Artigues Vitter tomb Headstone
      Ferreol Artigues-Berthe Vitter tomb Headstone
      Ferreol Artigues-Berthe Vitter tomb Headstone
      Albert L. Vitter (1915-2003,) Audrey St Raymond Vitter (1920-2005.) Burial: Metairie Cemetery, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA. Plot: Section 5 - Artigues - Vitter tomb.


    2. [S1240] 1930 United States Federal Census, Year: 1930; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0214; FHL microfilm: 2340545.
      1930 United States Federal Census
      1930 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1930; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Page: 7A; Enumeration District: 0214; FHL microfilm: 2340545


    3. [S1151] 1940 United States Federal Census, Year: 1940; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: m-t0627-01432; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 36-375.
      1940 United States Federal Census
      1940 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1940; Census Place: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: m-t0627-01432; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 36-375


    4. [S466] Passenger Lists, The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana; NAI Number: 2848643; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85.
      New Orleans, Passenger Lists, 1813-1963 Document
      New Orleans, Passenger Lists, 1813-1963 Document
      The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana; NAI Number: 2848643; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Record Group Number: 85


    5. [S1036] 1920 United States Federal Census, Year: 1920; Census Place: New Orleans Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: T625_618; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 9.
      1920 United States Federal Census
      1920 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1920; Census Place: New Orleans Ward 1, Orleans, Louisiana; Roll: T625_618; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 9


    6. [S649] U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-current, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.;), "U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012"; School Name: University of Notre Dame; Year: 1934.
      U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1990 Document
      U.S., School Yearbooks, 1900-1990 Document
      "U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012"; School Name: University of Notre Dame; Year: 1934


    7. [S427] New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.Original data - Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls); Records of the U.S. Customs Service, R;), Year: 1921; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 3008; Line: 2; Page Number: 31.
      New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Document
      New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 Document
      Year: 1921; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 3008; Line: 2; Page Number: 31


    8. [S1022] U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2011;), 1956.
      At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.


    9. [S1252] A tous les Vitter du monde, Jean-Pierre Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: France; Date: October 2002;), Jeff Vitter and the Vitter line in America, pages 3, 13, 16–19.
      This manuscript is a comprehensive and very entertaining account of the Vitter generations written by Jean-Pierre Vitter (Jeff Vitter's 4th cousin, 1x removed) in October 2002. It's easily translated, e.g., using Google Translate. The story starts with Jeff's 4th great grandfather Hérard Vitter, who moved from "l'Autriche Antérieure" to the town of Clerval in the Doubs region of France in the 1700s. Hérard's father in the old country was Mathieu Vitter, and his son Pierre is the one who emigrated from France to New Orleans in 1843. The big mystery that remained was exactly where Hérard Vitter came from originally. (See JPV's follow-on work, Le sang qui coule dans nos veines, for answers.)
      https://vitter.org/Genealogy/Documents/JeanPierreVitterBook.pdf

    10. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), The Aha! Moment That Led to This Website.
      When Jeff Vitter was growing up in New Orleans, his parents A. L. Vitter Jr. and Audrey (née St. Raymond) Vitter would always tell the family about their trips to France as young children to meet relatives, but they didn't know many particulars beyond their grandparents, especially on my dad's paternal side. Jeff's Aha! moment came when he combined technologies — new and old — to discover how, when, and where the Vitters came to the USA from Europe.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/relativityresearch.php

    11. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), A. L. & Audrey Vitter: Role Models Extraordinaires.
      Jeff Vitter's parents A. L. Jr. & Audrey (née St. Raymond) Vitter (grandparent names Père and Mimi) led accomplished lives of extraordinary service and caring for others — a legacy for generations to follow (including many Domers and a killer cookbook!).
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/ALandAudreyVitter.php

    12. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Photos from Mimi's Homecoming Weekend, June 2006.
      We couldn't bury Audrey "Mimi" (née St. Raymond) Vitter in New Orleans at the time of her death because of the devastation from Hurricane Katrina. When her body was brought back home for reburial eight months later, it was a time for several family events and to celebrate her life.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/vitterreunion2006.php

    13. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Albert Artigues & All That Jazz.
      For the middle part of the 20th century, Albert Artigues Jr. and his cornet were mainstays in the New Orleans jazz scene at night, while he worked at the family business during the days.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/AlbertArtigues.php

    14. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Après le Aha! moment (et avant aussi!).
      As highlighted in "The Aha! Moment That Led to This Website," Jeff Vitter made a big breakthrough in December 2000 when he discovered when, where, and how his Vitter ancestors came from Europe to the USA. Much correspondence behind the scenes led up to and beyond that discovery. This history gives an inside look at the correspondences that genealogists engage in and how what we understand grows (we hope!) with time.
      https://www.vitter.org/familytree/histories/jeffemail2001.php

    15. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Artigues Family Notes and Open Questions.
      A. L. Vitter Jr. had Artigues connections on both sides of his family: his mother (Marie) Berthe (née Artigues) Vitter was the daughter of immigrant Ferréol Jean Marie Artigues, and his 1st cousin 2x removed Marie Louise Cathalongne (daughter of 1843 Clerval immigrant Marie Louise Vitter) married immigrant Jean Ferréol "John" Artigues. Ferréol and John were 1st cousins. This history includes records about the Artigues, including several who we think are related to us but we haven't yet shown.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/artigues.php

    16. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Our Loyal Guardians Rex & Queenie.
      Rex and Queenie have stood guard over Vitter-Artigues homes in New Orleans since about 1910 and have a fascinating (and still mysterious) genealogy of their own.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/RexandQueenie.php

    17. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Relativity Research.
      The underlying theme of our website is research on relativity — our relatives pulsate outward in our time-space continuum in a series of gravitational waves spanning many generations and relationships! This page gives an overview of several family histories, beginning with Jeff Vitter's Aha! moment, which ultimately led to creation of this website.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/relativityresearch.php

    18. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Remembering Those Back in Uzan.
      In the 1800s, the Ferran, St. Raymond, and Cougot families lived around a small village in southwestern France called Uzan (pronounced "u-ZHANG" in the local patois). After emigrating to the U. S. A., they sponsored a monument to those from Uzan who gave their lives during World War I. It stands there still today in front of the city hall.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/UzanWWI.php

    19. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Three Vitters of the French Resistance.
      World War II saw France divided and conquered by Hitler's Third Reich, and Louis, Roger, and Pierre Vitter went underground to fight as part of the Resistance.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/VitterFrenchResistance.php

    20. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Vitter Holiday Cards Through the Years.
      'Tis the Season to be jolly! Welcome to a tradition starting in 1945 spanning several generations of annual Christmas greeting cards, augmented from time to time with cards for other occasions.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/histories/holidaycards.php

    21. [S307] Family Database of Vitter-Weaver Family, Jeffrey & Sharon Vitter, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1996;), Descendants of Simon Wider (1667–1737) and Ursula Wick (born circa 1670) and Anna Maria Schietknecht (born 1678).
      Simon Wider (1667–1737) is a 7th great grandfather of Jeffrey S. Vitter, co-host of this website vitter.org. Simon lived in Bietingen, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany (near the eastern border of Schaffhouse, Switzerland). His great grandson Hérard Vitter (1772–1848, born Erhardus Wider) immigrated roughly 150 miles west to Clerval, France from Bietingen in 1799. Hérard's son Pierre Vitter (1803–1846) immigrated to New Orleans, Louisiana via Le Havre, France with his family in 1843.
      https://vitter.org/familytree/register.php?personID=I40609&tree=vittertree1&generations=50&tngmore=1

    22. [S1711] Justia, Albert L. Vitter, Jr. and Oliver J. Counce, Appellants, v. United States of America, Appellee, 279 F.2d 445 (5th Cir. 1960), US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit - 279 F.2d 445 (5th Cir. 1960), June 20, 1960, Rehearing Denied August 5, 1960.
      George R. Blue, A. J. Schmitt, Jr., Beard, Blue & Schmitt, New Orleans, La., for appellants.

      Lloyd J. Keno, Lee A. Jackson, Dept. of Justice, Washington, D. C., M. Hepburn Many, U. S. Atty., Prim B. Smith, Jr., Asst. U. S. Atty., New Orleans, La., Charles K. Rice, Asst. Atty. Gen., Robert N. Anderson, Atty., Dept. of Justice, Washington, D. C., Nicholas J. Gagliano, Asst. U. S. Atty., Metairie, La., for appellee.

      Before RIVES, Chief Judge, and CAMERON and BROWN, Circuit Judges.

      JOHN R. BROWN, Circuit Judge.

      The problem dealt with here is liability for the excise tax1 on payment of initiation fees as a condition precedent to becoming a member of the New Orleans Country Club. There are no disputed issues of fact, and summary judgment, all agree, was a proper method of disposition of the Taxpayers'2 refund suit. The controversy is confined to whether the District Court's decision against the Taxpayers and in favor of the Government was correct.

      Not the first dues-paying-taxpaying country-club member dissatisfied with such a handicap, Taxpayer appeals on three main grounds. First, there was no payment to or for the benefit of the Club so no taxable event ever occurred. Second, to invoke this application of the statute at this late date beginning in 1953 is grossly unfair. And third, if anything is due, it should be limited to the par value of the stock ($250) not the fluctuating market prices actually paid (see note 2, supra).

      For an organization whose aims reflect considerable ambitious hopes in the nonprofessional fields of athletic, intellectual, cultural and aesthetic attainments,3 New Orleans Country Club has at least one unique aspect. Stock in the Club, indispensable to regular membership, is regularly traded in as a security in the over-the-counter stock market of New Orleans. There, as in the case of stock of local banks and other business enterprises not listed on a national exchange, the price rises and falls as "Bid" and "Asked" make the current market.

      Therein lies the nub of the green. For this in turn seems to stem from the unusual fact that under the Club's charter it is not necessary that a regular member own a share of stock — he need only be the holder of it. Stock may therefore be owned by a non-member. And a member may be a non-stockholder. This gives the stock a speculative marketability in terms of possible appreciation in value unrestricted, as in the case of most lodges or clubs, to a select or approved group of persons as potential buyers. It is entirely possible then that one could buy a share of NOCC stock with no intention of ever being a member, or for that matter, with the certainty that from personality traits, business associations, past personal moral record, or similar considerations, the purchaser could never become a member.4

      But such is not our case. Taxpayer, in his desire to become a regular member purchased a share of stock in order to qualify himself as an applicant and obtain election to membership. To do so, Taxpayer bought the stock in the open market at its market value, note 2, supra.

      While this unique marketability does reflect an economic value giving the stock some attributes of a commercial investment, the charter makes clear that except for its potential appreciation for sale to one desiring membership, it has no real worth apart from enjoyment of the Club's facilities by a member holding it. The stock is subject "to pro rata assessment at the direction of the Board of Governors for the purpose of paying the necessary initial and running expenses of the Club * * *." And "on failure of any stockholder to pay any assessment levied by the Board of Governors * * * on the share or shares held by him * * *," such stock is subject to sale with the proceeds thereof to "be applied to the payment of all unpaid assessments due by said share of stock * * *." Even more critical, this lien with right of sale expressly covers "other indebtedness due to the Club by the member in whose name [the stock] stands * * *." And while, as indicated above, the stock is traded in on the open market, the sale might not be effective since no share of stock can be transferred "until all past due and unpaid assessments, and other indebtedness, are paid in full."

      Thus the stockholder has, for a corporate investment, an "asset" of continuing liability, not the usual nonliability. From an economic point of view, the charter's own language plainly sets forth that the "only right to be enjoyed by a shareholder who is not also a member shall be the right * * * to receive his pro rata share of the assets" in the event of dissolution of the corporation. Even in this he has limited rights because, as a non-member-stockholder, he cannot vote on any matter concerning either current operations or dissolution. What stock ownership lacks in an economic sense is even more glaringly absent concerning non-financial, personal enjoyment. The charter expressly provides that "ownership of one or more shares of the capital stock of this corporation shall not confer upon the holder any of the rights or privileges of membership." Nor, except from a vantage point off the premises could he even look at or examine the properties an aliquot portion of which he might sometime receive in distribution if others so voted. The broad denial of membership privileges is explicitly spelled out. Stock ownership shall not "include the right to vote on any question or to use or go upon the property or assets of the organization, unless, in addition, the said holder shall have been duly elected a member of this organization in the manner" prescribed.

      On the other hand, while the stock has slight economic benefits and none for enjoyment, it is indispensable to membership. The charter-authorized By-Laws prescribe that a regular member must be the holder of a share of stock.5 Neither the charter nor the by-laws prescribe how the stock should be obtained, and it is uncontradicted that such stock is frequently transferred by gift, devise or inheritance. A regular member in addition to being the holder of a share of stock is at the time of his election also required to pay directly to the Club a sum fixed and described as an initiation fee.

      The one thing in this case as obvious as a water hazard is that for Taxpayer to achieve the status of a regular member of NOCC, he had to hold a share of stock. He did not own one. Presumably he could not borrow, lease or beg one. In any event he held the stock by buying it. In a real sense, then, this, in the words of the statute was "required as a condition precedent to membership." 26 U.S.C.A. § 4242(b), note 1, supra.

      Taxpayer does not really dispute this, nor could he. But, he insists, such candid realism neither produces a stymie nor puts him irretrievably in a bunker. This is so, he contends, because there is a conflict between § 4241 and § 4242, note 1, supra. He reasons it this way. The tax prescribed in § 4241 is imposed on a percentage of "any amount paid as initiation fees to * * * a club." Here there was no payment to the Club. The payment was to the former stock owner. On the other hand, § 4242(b) undertakes to impose the tax "irrespective of the person or organization to whom [such initiation fee is] paid, contributed, or loaned." The conclusion is then asserted that since the tax imposing provision prescribes one recipient and the next section in general terms another, there is a conflict requiring construction favorable to the precise provision and, incidentally, to the Taxpayer.

      But this is an artificial cutting up of a single statute into several unrelated parts, not a reading of it together as a whole. The second part, § 4242, is not separate. Indeed, its topic head as "Definitions" shows a congressional purpose to read all stated in § 4242 as though it were physically written into § 4241. As reconstructed its meaning is substantially this. There is imposed a 20% tax on any amount paid, contributed or loaned as a condition precedent to membership in a club irrespective of the person or organization to whom such payment, contribution or loan is made and whether that which is received for such payment, contribution or loan is evidenced by a certificate of interest or indebtedness or share of stock.

      In the amendments6 which eventuated in the statute, note 1, Congress was intending to plug not only demonstrated loopholes,7 but to make certain that whatever device was followed, if the payment was actually essential to becoming eligible for membership in a club, that payment, by whatever form, was both the taxable event and a determination of its amount.

      Payments made to the former owner of stock to comply with the club's requirement that a member be a stockholder have uniformly been held to be within the broad definition of "initiation fees." Munn v. Bowers, 2 Cir., 1931, 47 F.2d 204; Knollwood Club v. United States, 1931, 48 F.2d 971, 94 Ct. Cl. 1; Wild Wing Lodge v. Blacklidge, 7 Cir., 1932, 59 F.2d 421. In none was the payment either to or for the benefit of the club. This approach is reflected by the regulations8 which, unchanged after many years, have received the implied congressional imprimatur from continued acquiescence.9

      Having progressed this far on the course, the other two objections take little treatment. The complaint is that since the tax was not asserted against persons acquiring stock of NOCC from 1930 through 1953 (when the Collector commenced his assessments), it is unfair. Apparently this is so for two reasons. First, when the heavy hand of the Tax Collector fell, it depressed the resale market value in substantially like amounts. Second, the newer members have had to incur additional costs which earlier members escaped. But whatever the reason, it cannot prevail here with us. Ours is a narrow function to interpret, not make, the law. If suffering this economic penalty of loss of stroke and distance from this inequitable unplayable lie is too severe, relief may not come from the umpire. The rules have first to be changed, and Congress may alone do that.

      The remaining argument that the tax should be computed on the par value ($250) simply ignores the nature of the tax. It is not on the acquisition of the stock or the value of the stock. It is an excise tax on the payment required to obtain the stock as a qualification for membership. What is paid, not what is obtained, is the measure of the tax.

      Affirmed.

      CAMERON, Circuit Judge, dissents.

      1
      The 1954 Code, 26 U.S.C.A. §§ 4241-4242, applicable to one case, and substantially identical to the 1939 Code, 26 U.S. C.A. §§ 1710-1712 (1952 Ed.) applicable to the other, provides:

      "§ 4241. Imposition of tax.

      "(a) Rate. — There is hereby imposed —

      "(1) Dues or membership fees. — A tax equivalent to 20 percent of any amount paid as dues or membership fees to any social, athletic, or sporting club or organization, if the dues or fees of an active resident annual member are in excess of $10 per year.

      "(2) Initiation fees. — A tax equivalent to 20 percent of any amount paid as initiation fees to such a club or organization, if such fees amount to more than $10, or if the dues or membership fees, not including initiation fees, of an active resident annual member are in excess of $10 per year. * * *

      "(b) By whom paid. — * * * the taxes imposed by this section shall be paid by the person paying such dues or fees, * * *." 26 U.S.C.A. § 4241 (1959 Supp.)

      "§ 4242. Definitions.

      "(a) Dues. — As used in this part the term `dues' includes any assessment, irrespective of the purpose for which made, and any charges for social privileges or facilities, or for golf, tennis, polo, swimming, or other athletic or sporting privileges or facilities, for any period of more than six days; and

      "(b) Initiation fees. — As used in this part the term `initiation fees' includes any payment, contribution, or loan, required as a condition precedent to membership, whether or not any such payment, contribution, or loan is evidenced by a certificate of interest or indebtedness or share of stock, and irrespective of the person or organization to whom paid, contributed, or loaned." 26 U.S.C.A. § 4242 (1955 ed.).

      2
      These are two separate suits consolidated for trial and appeal brought as test cases and stipulated to control the outcome of 80 other cases. We refer indiscriminantly to one or both plaintiffs as Taxpayer

      Counce: Purchased stock November 24, 1953, paying $1,425 plus brokerage; also paid initiation fee direct to Club, elected and admitted to regular membership February 26, 1954. Vitter: Purchased stock February 4, 1957, paying $5,600 plus brokerage; also paid initiation fee direct to Club; elected and admitted to regular membership February 7, 1957.

      3
      The charter provides:

      "The objects and purposes for which this corporation is established are declared to be:

      "To promote and foster, and afford opportunity for, athletic and other like exercises, and such sports as Golf, Lawn Tennis, Polo, Baseball, Football, Bowling, Boating, Swimming, Sailing, Driving, Horse-back riding, Automobiling, Canoeing, Gun-practice, Rowing, Hunting, Fishing, Fencing, Gymnastics, and all other in-door and out-door social and athletic games and sports; to regulate social intercourse and amusement among its members; to promote among them refinement of manners and intellectual improvement by the establishment and maintenance of a club-house with provisions for out-door and in-door games and sports, by an accumulation of well-assorted and standard books and periodicals, and to these ends, to buy, sell, erect, hold, lease, or otherwise acquire, and to convey or otherwise alienate and dispose of, and to maintain and operate one or more club-houses and appurtenances, including grounds, out-houses, golf links, tennis courts, boat houses, garages, hangars, wharves, stables, hitching sheds, cafes and refreshment rooms, polo field, bowling alleys, athletic grounds, shooting ranges, gymnasium, natatorium, and all other necessary paraphernalia and equipment incidental to the carrying on of the sports above enumerated, and kindred out-door and in-door sports and games."

      4
      Included within such category and without any moral aspersions would be corporate purchasers who, as inanimates, could never ride a horse, sink a putt, return a volley, read a well assorted book, or enjoy the other fruits of membership described in note 3, supra

      5
      "2. The several classes of membership in the Club shall be as follows:

      "A) Regular Membership — Shall consist of persons of legal age, who are registered holders of at least one share of the capital stock of the Club."

      6
      This is traced in Munn v. Bowers, 2 Cir., 1931, 47 F.2d 204-205, certiorari denied, 283 U.S. 845, 51 S. Ct. 492, 75 L. Ed. 1454

      7
      Typical of these the Taxpayer points to Lukens v. United States, 1926, 62 Ct. Cl. 598; Alliance Country Club v. United States, 1926, 62 Ct. Cl. 579; Page v. United States, 1926, 62 Ct. Cl. 590; Masonic Country Club v. Holden, 6 Cir., 1927, 18 F.2d 553. See also Senate Rpt. on Public Bills, 70th Cong. 1st Sess., p. 34

      8
      The applicable regulation carries forward without changes of wording the regulation initially adopted. See Knollwood Club v. United States, 1931, 48 F.2d 971 at page 972, 94 Ct. Cl. 1

      "It is not material whether the applicant has any hope or expectation of a return of his payment upon resignation, death, or other circumstances, nor is it material to whom he pays the money. For instance, if a golf club requires incoming members as a condition precedent to membership to purchase either from it or from retiring members a share of stock, the tax attaches to any such payment for the stock regardless of the fact that it represents a property interest in the assets of the club. Likewise, if the purchase of a share of stock in a landholding corporation is a necessary precedent to membership in the club, the amount paid for such share of stock is taxable. * * *." Treasury Reg. 43 (1941) § 101.28.

      9
      When a Treasury Regulation interprets a section of the Code and the Regulation remains in effect and unchanged for a long period of time, re-enactment of the statute without change is presumed to show congressional approval of the Regulation which thereby acquires the force and effect of law. Commissioner v. Flowers, 1946, 326 U.S. 465, 469, 66 S. Ct. 250, 90 L. Ed. 203, 207; Boehm v. Commissioner, 1945, 326 U.S. 287, 291-292, 66 S. Ct. 120, 90 L. Ed. 78; Helvering v. R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., 1939, 306 U.S. 110, 114-115, 59 S. Ct. 423, 83 L. Ed. 536, 540-541; White v. United States, 1938, 305 U.S. 281, 291, 59 S. Ct. 179, 83 L. Ed. 172, 178-179; Helvering v. Winmill, 1938, 305 U.S. 79, 83, 59 S. Ct. 45, 83 L. Ed. 52, 55; Cammarano v. United States, 1959, 358 U.S. 498, 510, 79 S. Ct. 524, 3 L. Ed. 2d 462, 470; Jones' Estate v. Commissioner, 5 Cir., 1942, 127 F.2d 231, 232; Commissioner v. West Production Co., 5 Cir., 1941, 121 F.2d 9, 12; cf. Estate of Woodward v. Commissioner, 24 T.C. 883, 890, affirmed sub. nom. Barnhill v. Commissioner, 5 Cir., 1957, 241 F.2d 496, 499
      https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/appellate-courts/F2/279/445/458877/

    23. [S959] Notes of A. L. Vitter Jr, Tuesday 26 May 1981.
      At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.


    24. [S958] Notes of Audrey St. Raymond Vitter, Monday–Tuesday, 18–19 May 1981, notes of trip to Southwest France by A.L. Vitter Jr. & Audrey St. Raymond Vitter.
      The Larneilh house was sold by Jean Ferran (represented by Jean Péré) and Marie Ferran (presumably Jean's sister not his wife) on 2 April, 1905 to Pierre Marquehosse, including 4 hectares of land for 8,290 francs. The total sale including additional land was for 22,500 francs. The owner during the visits to the farm by A.L & Audrey St. Raymond Vitter Jr. in 1981 and Jeff & Sharon Weaver Vitter and Donna Vitter in 1986 was Pierre's son Amédé Marquehosse, who had three sons and three daughters and who lived at 64370 Arthez de Béarn, Uzan, France.

      The notes also give a high-level description of various birth and marriage certificates copied from the Anères archives.
      At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.


    25. [S125] Notes of John Ferran, John Ferran, (Name: Self; Location: New Orleans, Orleans, Louisiana, USA;), Written May 1, 1981 on a notecard as background for Mimi for her trip to Anères and elsewhere in France and Europe in May 1981.

    26. [S285] The Times Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate, (Name: Advance Publications; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1837;), Little Lost Dog Statue is Collared in Metarie, Times-Picayune, March 23, 1987.
      Times-Picayune Rex kidnapping, March 23, 1987 Document
      Times-Picayune Rex kidnapping, March 23, 1987 Document


    27. [S285] The Times Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate, (Name: Advance Publications; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1837;), Family Offers Reward for Return of Yard Dog, Times-Picayune, March 22, 1987.
      Times-Picayune Rex Reward Notice, March 22, 1987 Document
      Times-Picayune Rex Reward Notice, March 22, 1987 Document


    28. [S1022] U.S., City Directories, 1822-1995, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2011;), 1945.

    29. [S285] The Times Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate, (Name: Advance Publications; Location: New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Date: Since 1837;), "Art by the Yard," The Times Picayune, 4 Apr 1976, page 249, Sunday Supplement.
      https://infoweb.newsbank.com/apps/news/document-view?p=AMNEWS&docref=image/v2%3A1223BCE5B718A166%40EANX-1307F0EF797DD92A%402442873-13015A3097963CC3%40248
      Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document
      Times Picayune article about Rex and Queenie 1976 April 04 Document


    30. [S1533] New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., Marriage Records Index, 1831-1964, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2002;), Louisiana Vital Records; Volume: 34; Page: 970.
      Record for Albert Leopold Vitter
      https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=6500&h=192962&indiv=try

    31. [S1000] Newspaper, Magazine, or Media Outlet, Marriage Vitter-Artigues, 11 Dec 1912 22 Dec 1912.
      https://newscomse.newspapers.com/clip/45615553/marriage-vitter-artigues-11-dec-1912/?xid=637
      Marriage Vitter-Artigues, 11 Dec 1912 Document
      Marriage Vitter-Artigues, 11 Dec 1912 Document
      Times Democrat, page 9


    32. [S210] Notes of Jean Jacques Artigues and Blanche Artigues Johnson, Jean Jacques Artigues and Blanche Artigues Johnson, (Name: Self;), Email and FAX by Bert F. Artigues to Jeff Vitter, 19–20 April 2004. Typed notes by Jean Jacques Artigues with handwritten notations by Blanche Artigues Johnson. Later annotations on contents by Jeff Vitter.
      https://vitter.org/Genealogy/Documents/Jean%20Jacques%20Artigues%20Notes.pdf

    33. [S1000] Newspaper, Magazine, or Media Outlet.
      1943
      Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter Wedding Announcement, newspaper from 1943 Document
      Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter Wedding Announcement, newspaper from 1943 Document
      Audrey St. Raymond and Albert Vitter wedding announcement from, 27 Jun 1943.