Heinrich Herr Weber (Weaver)

Heinrich Herr Weber (Weaver)

Male 1690 - 1745  (~ 55 years)
Person ID: I25489 


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  • Name Heinrich Herr Weber (Weaver)  [1, 2, 3
    Name Henry  [3
    Name Henry Weber  [3
    Notes 
    • Weaverland Cemetery By Martin G. Weaver in 1933
      Eighteen miles east of Lancaster, two miles northeast of Blue Ball, in East Earl Township, Lancaster County. Pa., near the hard road leading from Blue Ball to Terre Hill, a short distance northwest from the Weaverland meeting houses, is a small grave yard, enclosed with a five rail post fence, which was kept and protected by such fencing nearly two hundred years by the descendants of the several families whose ancestors had planned to bury their dead in this sacred spot; but to the average resident of the community and to the stranger it was a spot of neglect, because it was often overgrown with weeds before the weary relatives thought of mowing and cleaning it, which was done about twice a year.

      Within this small, enclosure the dust of the earth has mingled with the mortal remains of the first white settlers of the beautiful vale known and remembered as "Weber's Thal," "Weaver's Dale," now Weaverland, since the organization of the first Mennonite congregation, by that name in 1730.
      Henry Weber In May or June, 1745, the remains of Henry Weber, owner of the land from which half of the graveyard was taken, were borne across the fields from his humble home on the east banks of what is now known as Blue Ball Run, a home which he had erected during the summer of 1722, and occupied by his family since the spring of 1723, which with the homes of his brothers, were the first real homes for family life in this dale.

      This home was midway between the present farm seats of Joseph M. Weaver and Henry M. Weaver. Henry Weber was about 54 years old and left his widow, who was Maudlin Kendig, before marriage, a daughter of Jacob Kendig, and a granddaughter of Martin Kendig, of the first ship load of Mennonite colonists on the Pequea, who with two sons, Henry, aged 9 and Christian, fourteen years with six daughters, several of them married, one of them, Eva, who afterwards became the wife of John Wissler was an infant. To this pioneer widow, it became the lot to manage a farm of nearly four hundred acres and rear her family. He had made a will shortly before his death, written in German. It was never recorded and by some means it was lost or destroyed; but the record of its proving remains at Lancaster, and in the recitals of numerous deeds when his land was disposed of after the death of his wife, in 1758, when all the children had attained the age of twenty-one years, excepting Eva. By the recital of several deeds dated July 30, 1765, recorded at Lancaster in Deed book H, page 302, etc. , it is shown that the family mothered by the brave young widow, followed the outline given in the German written will of the father, (no doubt penned by his own hand); but when Eva Wissler arrived at the age of twenty-one years, she relinquished the part of the farm, given to her, and the entire original farm of 365 acres with its various allowances which made it to contain about 400 acres, was vested in the ownership of the two sons, Henry and Christian, and nearly all of it is still retained by their lineal descendants (1933) being eight farm seats and several smaller homes.
      Jacob Weber: In 1747, two years after the death of his brother Henry, the older brother, Jacob, also the father of a large family, who were older than Henry's family, died in the home founded by him, also on the east banks of Blue Ball Run, at or about the same place where the farm home of Isaac H. Nolt is maintained. His home farm contained over 500 acres, which is now divided into eleven separate farms, and at several places being parts of other farms. The stone meeting house, where the Weaverland Conference Mennonites worship, and the large graveyard, containing over two thousand graves, are also parts of this original farm. One half of the village of Blue Ball also occupies a strip of this plantation.

      His will, made a short time before his death, was also set aside and the family made a division of the real estate to suit themselves, by a mutual agreement, and a Benjamin Bowman administered on the personal property, filing his account (which remains in the Lancaster Court House records) in 1762. Bowman, was no doubt a brother, or at least a near relative to the widow, as she was, Anna Bauman, a daughter of Wendel Bauman, who belonged to the first Swiss settlement on the Pequea. She, like the widow of his brother, Henry, also survived her husband many years. It is safe to believe that tradition is correct in the saying that these brothers were interred in this enclosure, close together.
      George Weber: The remains of George Weber, who is supposed to have been the youngest of the three original settlers in the vale, were carried hither from his home erected at the beautiful springs, the present home of Benjamin F. Weaver, a little east from the brick meeting house, in 1772, while those of his wife, Barbara, who is supposed to have been a sister to Jacob and Christian Good, the ancestors of the numerous clan of that name in Brecknock Township, were carried and laid by the side of her husband, in 1782; these two graves are plainly marked with their initials on well preserved, smooth sandstones, to wit: "G. W. 1772," and B. W. 1782," being in the first row of graves on the western side of the enclosure.

      David Martin: Near the grave of George Weber and his wife, are the graves of David Martin, and his wife, Elizabeth Miller. She died in 1774, and he was carried to his last resting place in November, 1784, having died on the tenth day of the month. His will was proven on December 4, of that year, proving that this stone, with his initials "D. M. 1784," and the one "E. M. 1774" mark the resting places of these two people, from whose land the southern half of the graveyard was taken by mutual consent between him and Henry Weber, as the plot was accurately surveyed so that it contained forty perches of land, twenty perches taken from the farm of Henry Weber, now owned by one of his descendants, Joseph M. Weaver, and twenty perches taken from the farm of David Martin, that part of the farm now owned by one of his lineal descendants, Phares M. Zimmerman, the imaginary line passing diagonally through the burying ground. The next grave to the south of Elizabeth Martin, is one marked "A. M. 80" 17-. In 1912, when a record of the stones in this God's acre was taken the notes give the missing figures to have been 1759.

      Andreas Martin: Very reliable traditional information, with proofs of its accuracy, tells us that Andreas Martin, the father of David Martin, having been imprisoned and detained in Switzerland, when his son sailed for America in 1728, came over many years later and made his home with his son, where he died. Rupp's "Thirty Thousand Names" gives the name of Martin Andras, who came to the port of Philadelphia in 1749.

      A saying came to the writer from a descendant of David Martin, through George, Abraham, George and Isaac W., that his grandchildren often spoke about the heavy swaths of grass which were cut and mowed by their grandfather with his large German scythe, which he brought with him from Europe, because his rows were harder to spread for drying. The same story came. to the writer from the descendants through another line of descent, as being told and repeated in Canada. Another line of lineal descendants told and retold the sayings to their children and it came from Indiana back to the old home. All these graves are found in the first row, along the western side of the enclosure.
      Christian Weber: Passing on to the second generation in America, we notice the grave of Christian Weber, in the first row. He was the oldest. son of Henry Weber, born December 25 (Christmas Day), 1731. Married Magdalena Rutt, (said to have been a sister to Christian Rutt, of Cedar Run), September 30, 1749. They lived together for fifty-five years on the homestead built for them, and now owned by Christian M. Zimmerman, on a section or half part of the original Henry Weber purchase. His wife died February 16, 1804, being in the 71st year of her age. Sixteen years later, February 13, 1820, he died and was laid to rest beside the remains of his wife, aged 88 years, 1 month and 9 days.

      From a letter in German, printed after his death, we learn that these venerable people were the parents of seventeen children, nine daughters and seven sons. Seven sons and five daughters had ninety-nine children at the time of his death. He also had 188 great-grandchildren, and five great-great-grandchildren at the time of his death, leaving a total of 309 descendants.

      His lifelong friend, and one of his nearest neighbors, Bishop Henry Martin, preached the funeral sermon from the text: Revelation 14: 12 - 13. He announced the hymn, now numbered 203 in the old German hymn books, "Mieni Sorgin, Angst und Plagen Laufen Mit Der Zeit Zu End."

      Heine, or Henry Weber: In the third row, we find the tomb of his younger brother, Henry, who was known from his youth as "Heine" Weber. He followed his brother to their final resting place six years and twenty-four days later, he having died in the large stone mansion still standing and occupied by Henry M. Weaver (the seventh) and his family, and which he built for himself in 1764. He died March 20, 1826, aged 89 years and 11 months. His wife, who was Eva Hershey, died May 7, 1799, aged 62 years and 4 months.

      Their six sisters married and moved from the immediate vicinity and scenes of their childhood. They were not interred in the old family "Gottas Ackar."

      Henry Weber: In the first row, Henry Weber, son of George, was laid to rest beside his parents, having lived with them on the old homestead at the springs, He died September 12, 1787, at the age of 49 years, 10 months and 8 days. His wife, or widow, Elizabeth ---------, died at the old homestead, June 22, 1815, aged 72 years, 9 months and 26 days.

      Hans Weber: Hans Weber, a brother to the last named Henry, the oldest son of George and Barbara Weber, lies buried in the fourth row. He was born in 1730, and died October 20, 1802 aged 72 years. He lived and died on the homestead near Goodville, on the north bank of Cedar Run, afterwards handed down to his son, Samuel, then to his son, Jonathan, and finally was the home of the Levi Martin family, and is now owned by Jonas M. Zimmerman. Hans Weber's first wife was Magdalena Myers, with whom he had several children. But whether she is interred here and has no marker to her grave is not known. His second wife, Franey, or Feronica Seichrist, with whom he had a large and influential family of sons and daughters, followed her husband to this cemetery seven months later, having died May 20, 1803. None of their children came to the same city of the dead.
      Peter Weber, another son of Christian Weber and Magdalena Rutt, a brother to Samuel, lies in row 8. He was born March 7, 1761, and died April 7, 1837, aged 76 years and 1 month. His wife Veronica Wenger, died August 17, 1843, aged 77 years, 9months and 29 days. The upper part of his tombstone was broken off by some means, some time after 1912, when a record of all the graves was taken, and the inscription on the marble stone was lost or taken away, but the above is the correct data as copied at that time. The tombstone of his wife stands beside the broken stone and can readily be located. These people were the grandparents of the late Bishop George Weaver, and the great-grandparents of the late Bishop Benjamin Weaver. They lived on the farm seat which is now the place of the farm buildings of the farm owned by Henry M. Martin.
      see http://www.jdweaver.com/weavland/cemetery.html

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      Weaverland Cemetery Story
      1700's
      Weaverland, Pennsylvania

      hettlers
      hettlers originally shared this on 28 Dec 2009

      Linked To
      Christian Weber Jacob Weber George Weber Andreas Merdian Henry Weber Heinrich Weber David Martin
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      Comments

      Susan Corbett Weaverland Cemetery Story: I just found this today and it's wonderful! Christian & Magdalena Rutt Weber are my 7 X great grandparents and it's great to find this online. The details fill out the summary I have from the Weaver family narrative of 1910, updated last in 1956, including history traced from "Rupps History of Thirty Thousand Names".
      Thank you for the story! Sue Corbett 5/6/10
      9 years ago Flag Hide

      johnDweaver Weaverland Cemetary: I had the pleasure to visit this place in the mid 1990s and took pencil rubbings of the gravestones to bring back to the Weaver family in Elkhart Indiana. My aunts, one of whom had visited decades before me, had described the location perfectly. And, after coincidental directions from a distant relative at a nearby restaurant, we were directed to the home of Aamon Weaver (I think was his name). He, in turn, guided us back into the farm fields (he seemed about 100 years old) where we found a couple ladies cutting the grass and taking care of the enclosed area. All he said to them was "Take care of them, they're Weavers" and he left us and went back to his house. We enjoyed the peaceful surroundings and were proud of the preserved history of our family. The best stroke of luck in our quest was "The Book" that Aamon and his family had compiled and published, detailing the history of the Weber family. This was the key that helped us trace our line even further back from Indiana and Pennsylvania, to Europe in the early 1400s. Through Ancestry.com, we are able to go back even further and have traced a line to the year 909. God, bless the dedicated descendants of Johan and Maria. Thank you for preserving this treasure.
      8 years ago Flag Hide

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      What kind of media is this? Portrait Place Headstone Document / Certificate Other
      Date
      Place
      Description
    Born Jun 1690  Schaffhausen, Schaffhausen, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gender Male 
    Died 21 Jun 1745  Blue Ball, Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Buried Weberthal Cemetery, Weaverland, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Siblings
     1. Reverend Johann Herr Weber (ID:I25488),   b. 1683, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jan 1775, Lampeter, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     2. Rev. Jageli Heinrich Weber (ID:I25470),   b. Jan 1688, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1747, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 59 years)
     3. Private (ID:I29088),   b. 1692,   d. DECEASED, Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. George Herr Weber (ID:I25493),   b. 1693, Schaffhausen, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jan 1772, Lampeter, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     5. Maria Herr Weber (ID:I25491),   b. 1695, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1787, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)
     6. Hans Herr Weber (ID:I25492),   b. 1698,   d. Apr 1755, Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     7. Anna Catharina Herr Weber (ID:I25490),   b. 9 Jun 1700, Baden, Aargau, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1727, Sea, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 27 years)

    Parents

    Family ID: F17498 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father Johann Anton Weber (ID:I25484),   b. 1640, Schaffhausen, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Dec 1724, Pequea, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Margaretha Sieber Kendig Herr (ID:I25485),   b. 1663, Zürich, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Dec 1725, Pequea, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 1680  Bäretswil, Zürich, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5

    Family

    Family ID: F18949  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Wife Magdalena Maudlin Kendig (ID:I30456),   b. 1703, Dübendorf, Zürich, Switzerland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1758, Blue Ball, Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Married Mar 1717/18  Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Children 
      1. Mary Kendig Weber (ID:I30454),   b. 1717, Blue Ball, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1780, Lampeter, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
      2. Mary Kendig Weber (ID:I26112),   b. 1720, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1798, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
      3. Anna Kendig Weber (Weaver) (ID:I26107),   b. 1721, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1784, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 63 years)
      4. Beverly Weber (ID:I26113),   b. 1724, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1740  (Age 16 years)
      5. Christian Kendig Weber (Weaver) (ID:I26111),   b. 25 Dec 1731, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1820, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
      6. Henry Kendig Weber (ID:I26110),   b. 11 Apr 1736, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1826, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
      7. Eva Catherine Weber (ID:I26114),   b. 1738, Blue Ball, Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Nov 1825, Centre, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
      8. Mary Magdelena Kendig Weber (ID:I26109),   b. 28 Oct 1738, Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 May 1819, Bird In Hand, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
      9. Elizabeth Weber (Weaver) (ID:I26115),   b. Abt 1740, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1770 and 1774  (Age ~ 30 years)

    Other Personal Events

    Arrival 1710  USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Arrival 1717  Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Religion Mennonite 
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsBorn - Jun 1690 - Schaffhausen, Schaffhausen, Switzerland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsArrival - 1710 - USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsArrival - 1717 - Weaverland, East Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - Mar 1717/18 - Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 21 Jun 1745 - Blue Ball, Earl, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Weberthal Cemetery, Weaverland, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
  • Headstones
    Weber Henry Headstone
    Weber Henry Headstone

  • Source Citations

    1. [S541] Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-2014, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2015;).
      Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-2014 Document
      Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Mennonite Vital Records, 1750-2014 Document


    2. [S988] Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online, (Date: 1959;), Bender, Harold S. "Weaver (Weber) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 12 March 2011. http://www.gameo.org/encyclopedia/contents/W432ME.html.
      Weaver (Weber) family

      Weaver is an old Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. As early as 1664 the Palatine Mennonite Census Lists reported two Webers, Peter at Oberflörsheim and Christian at Spiesheim. In 1685 Peter Weber was still living at Oberflörsheim (6 sons and a daughter), but there was a second Peter Weber at Waltzheim, Johannes Weber at Osthofen, and Heinrich Weber and Dietrich Weber at Gundersheim. In 1732 Peter Weber was a minister at Oberflörsheim. In 1738, in addition to the Weber families at Oberflörsheim (Peter Sr., Peter Jr., Dietrich, and Christian), there were also families at Gundersheim (Peter), Spiesheim (Johannes), Wolfsheim (Mathias, Johannes), and four Weber families at Heppenheim an der Wiese nearAlzey (Johannes, Heinrich, Martin, and Matthäus). All of these locations were in the Palatinate and west of the Rhine. The Weber family name has been well represented in this region since these beginnings. In 1940, according to the Franz Crous lists, there were 67 Mennonite Webers (including children) in the South German Mennonite churches, with only one elsewhere in Germany, at Krefeld. Of these families, 46 were in the Palatinate (Monsheim congregation leading with 22, Kühbörncheshof 8, Neudorferhof 7, Uffhofen 5, three other congregations 4), one in Frankfurt and two in the Ingolstadt congregation in Bavaria. Outstanding among the Webers in the 18th century was Peter Weber of Kindenheim (1731-1781), a very influential preacher and a strong Pietist.

      Several Webers emigrated from the Palatinate to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in the early 18th century. The brothers Jacob, Henry, George, and John Weber are known to have arrived before 1718. The first three established a settlement in the rich bottom land between Blue Ball and Conestoga, which came to be known as Weberthal or Weaverland, and from which the present Mennonite Church (MC) congregation, Weaverland Mennonite Church, takes its name. Among their descendants were two early bishops serving the Weaverland-Groffdale district (George, served from 1854-83, and Benjamin, from 1902-8) and a host of ministers serving both in the Weaverland district (MC) and elsewhere, chiefly inVirginia, Indiana, Ontario, and Kansas, as well as Old Order Mennonite Weavers in the Blue Ball-New Holland area. M. G. Weaver, himself a descendant, listed in his Mennonites of Lancaster Conference in 1931 a total of 32 ordained men (10 being deacons) bearing the name (3 Weber, 29 Weaver). Of these 32, 31 were serving in the Mennonite Church (MC), including four bishops, mostly in the Lancaster Conference and theVirginia Conference. In addition there were four Old Order Mennonite ministers with the name Weaver, seven Old Order Amish Mennonite ministers, and one General Conference Mennonite Church minister. J. W. Weaver (d. 1944) was the founder and manager of the Weaver Book Store at New Holland, Pennsylvania as well as a prominent Lancaster Conference evangelist. Edwin Weaver was a missionary bishop in India. Urias K. Weber served for a long time as pastor of the First Mennonite and Stirling Avenue Mennonite churches in Kitchener, Ontario.

      Bibliography
      Bender, Harold S. and Gerhard Hein. "Weber." Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols., edited by Christian Hege and Christian Neff. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV, 476.

      Crous, Franz. "Mennonitische Familien in Zahlen." Mennonitische Geschichtsblätter 5 (August 1940): 26-44.

      Gratz, Delbert. Bernese Anabaptists. Scottdale, PA, 1953.

      Peachey, Paul. Die soziale Herkunft der Schweizer Täufer. Karlsruhe, 1954.

      Stauffer, Ezra N. Weber or Weaver Family History. Nappanee, IN 1953.

      Weaver, Esther. Descendants of Henry B. Weaver. Ephrata, PA?, 1953.

      Weaver, M. G. Mennonites of Lancaster Conference. Scottdale, PA, 1931.

      Herald Press Information logo
      Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Scottdale, Pennsylvania, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 903. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.

      ©1996-2011 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.

      To cite this page:

      MLA style: Bender, Harold S. "Weaver (Weber) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 12 March 2011. http://www.gameo.org/encyclopedia/contents/W432ME.html.

    3. [S1251] Find A Grave, Henry Weber.
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/48398775/henry-weber
      Weber Henry Kendig Descendants Headstone
      Weber Henry Kendig Descendants Headstone
      Weber Henry Headstone
      Weber Henry Headstone


    4. [S1073] Mennonite Research Journal, (Name: Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society;), William Woys Weaver, "Johann Anton Weber and His Family: Swiss Colonists," Volume XIV, Number 1, January 1973, pages 1–11.
      Johann Anton is the name by which he is usually identified but Anton is a legendary name with an unknown origin. On all the documents related to his estate etc. he is simply "Hans Weber." Johann and Hans, of course, are both German forms of the English name John.

      Johann "John" is the son of Heinrich Weber and Elsbeth (Ruggin) Weber. His parents lived their whole lives in Switzerland and Johann was born there.
      In 1670 he lived in Muhlekram; in 1678 age 20, lived at Hamm; in 1682 lived in Hamm; in 1689 lived with Georg and Barbara in Neustadt.

      John, a Mennonite and Weaver, married his wife Margaretha Sieber Herr in 1680 in Baretswill, Switzerland.

      The family is listed in "Martyrs Mirror" as landing in Amsterdam, Holland from the Palatinate in 1693. Shortly after that the moved on to Freidrichstadt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Then in 1710 the family immigrated to America.
      The family moved for the last time in 1717 to Weaverland, Lancaster Co., PA.

      Between 1683 and 1695 they had 4 boys and a girl named: John Herr, Jacob Herr, Henry Herr, George Herr and Maria Herr Weber.

      The three (four?) sons of Hans Johann "John" Anton Weber were some of the first settlers in the Weaverland Valley but their father never lived there. He lived and died in the Pequa Valley, on the other side of the hill which divides the Pequea and Weaverland valleys. The Weber "Weizenthal" Pioneer Home is located at 1835 Pioneer Road, Lancanster Co., PA

      John was probably buried at Weizenthal [the name of the Weber plantation] as the first in a long line of Weavers buried in the old Weaver family burying ground there. The Weaver family stopped using this burial ground about 1850. No longer marked, the graveyard is located in a field in West Lampeter Township. The 21 marked graves were moved to Longenecker's Reformed Mennonite cemetery in the 1930s. The other 40-odd unmarked graves remain in the field and Johann Anton is undoubteldy among them. (William Woys Weaver: Mennonite Research Journal, January, 1973, pp.10-11)

    5. [S1251] Find A Grave, Margaretha Sieber "Maria" Herr Weber Memorial.
      Birth: 1663
      Zürich, Switzerland
      Death: Dec. 1, 1725
      Pequea
      Lancaster County
      Pennsylvania, USA

      Maria is the daughter of the Rev. Hans Herr and Elizabeth Mylin (Kendig) Herr of Switzerland. She married her husband Johann on 1680 in Baretswill, Switzerland.

      The family is listed in "Martyrs Mirror" as landing in Amsterdam, Holland from the Palatinate in 1693. Shortly after that the moved on to Freidrichstadt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Then in 1710 the family immigrated to America.

      The family moved for the last time in 1717 to Weaverland, Lancaster Co., PA.

      Between 1683 and 17000 they had 4 boys and 2 girls named: John, Jacob, Henry, George, Maria and Anna Catharine Weber.

      The three sons of Johan and Maria Weber, were some of the first settlers in the Weaverland Valley but John himself never lived there. John & Maria lived and died in the Pequa Valley, on the other side of the hill which divides the Pequea and Weaverland valleys.

      Johann & Maria Weber was probably buried at Weizenthal [the name of the Weber plantation] as the first in a long line of Weavers buried in the old Weaver family burying ground there. The Weaver family stopped using this burial ground about 1850.

      No longer marked, the graveyard is located in a field in West Lampeter Township. The 21 marked graves were moved to Longenecker's Reformed Mennonite cemetery in the 1930s. The other 40-odd unmarked graves remain in the field and Johann Anton is undoubteldy among them. (William Woys Weaver: Mennonite Research Journal, January, 1973, pp.10-11)

      Family links:
      Parents:
      Hans Herr (1639 - 1725)
      Elizabeth Mylin Kendig Herr (1639 - 1730)

      Spouse:
      Hans Johann Anton Weber (1658 - 1724)*

      Children:
      John Weber (1683 - 1775)*
      Jacob H. Weaver (1688 - 1747)*
      Henry Weber (1690 - 1745)*
      George Weber (1693 - 1772)*
      Maria Herr Weber Landis (1695 - 1787)*
      Anna Catharina Weber Martin (1700 - 1727)*

      Siblings:
      Margaretha Sieber Herr Weber (1663 - 1725)
      Maria Herr Brackbill (1673 - 1725)*
      Anna Kendig Herr Bauman (1679 - 1735)*
      Christian Herr (1680 - 1749)*

      *Calculated relationship

      Note: See photo of pioneer home "Weizenthal" for info on burial site.

      Burial:
      Unknown

      Created by: Jack Gilchrist
      Record added: Jan 20, 2010
      Find A Grave Memorial# 46921878

      Added by: Jack Gilchrist

      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/46921878/maria-margarethe-weber
      Weber Johann Anton and Herr Maria Margarethe Descendants Headstone
      Weber Johann Anton and Herr Maria Margarethe Descendants Headstone
      Photo found at http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=46921786