Rev. William Donaldson Wallace

Rev. William Donaldson Wallace

Male 1816 - 1871  (54 years)
Person ID: I27325 


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All
  • Name William Donaldson Wallace  [1, 2, 3, 4
    Title Rev. 
    Born 15 Jun 1816  Blount, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 4
    Gender Male 
    Died 3 Mar 1871  Bourbon, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Cause: Neuralgia brought on from going out in a storm while not feeling well to attend to someome 
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    from findagrave.com
    Buried Mason Cemetery, Petersburg, Bourbon, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    • William Donaldson Wallace, sixth child of William and Mary Ann (Nesbitt) Wallace, was born 15 June 1816 in Tennessee. He married Martha Jane Jones 10 May 1836 at Randolph County, Missouri.

      Census records show him in Randolph Co., Missouri in 1840; in Davis Co., Iowa in 1850; in Putnam Co., Missouri in 1860; and in Bourbon Co., Kansas in 1870.

      The following comes from the Wallace Family Genealogy, by Mrs. Glen E. Rush (1961):

      William Donaldson Wallace at an early age was ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church, at a Meeting of the Synod, in southern Iowa, and served congregations in that state, also in Missouri, and in Kansas for many years.

      In those pioneer days he soon saw the need of giving physical aid, as well as spiritual, for doctors were few and far between and he saw much suffering among the people whom he served. As a result, he took up the study of medicine in order that he might be to them a servant indeed.

      His death occurred on March 3, 1871, but a few days before, he had gone out in a storm to a sick bed when he, himself, was not feeling well. Neuralgia developed which reached the brain. His resting place is in Bourbon County, Kansas.

      Martha Jones-Wallace died August 2, 1882, of Bright's disease. Her resting place is in West Benton, Kansas cemetery.
      William Donaldson Wallace, sixth child of William and Mary Ann (Nesbitt) Wallace, was born 15 June 1816 in Tennessee. He married Martha Jane Jones 10 May 1836 at Randolph County, Missouri.

      Census records show him in Randolph Co., Missouri in 1840; in Davis Co., Iowa in 1850; in Putnam Co., Missouri in 1860; and in Bourbon Co., Kansas in 1870.

      The following comes from the Wallace Family Genealogy, by Mrs. Glen E. Rush (1961):

      William Donaldson Wallace at an early age was ordained a minister of the Presbyterian Church, at a Meeting of the Synod, in southern Iowa, and served congregations in that state, also in Missouri, and in Kansas for many years.

      In those pioneer days he soon saw the need of giving physical aid, as well as spiritual, for doctors were few and far between and he saw much suffering among the people whom he served. As a result, he took up the study of medicine in order that he might be to them a servant indeed.

      His death occurred on March 3, 1871, but a few days before, he had gone out in a storm to a sick bed when he, himself, was not feeling well. Neuralgia developed which reached the brain. His resting place is in Bourbon County, Kansas.

      Martha Jones-Wallace died August 2, 1882, of Bright's disease. Her resting place is in West Benton, Kansas cemetery.
    • Memorial ID 35446174
    Siblings
     1. Joseph Wallace (ID:I31432),   b. 1806, Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Apr 1843, Sugar Creek, Randolph, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     2. John Nesbitt Wallace (ID:I31433),   b. 28 Sep 1808, Union, Union, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Jul 1883, Stockton, San Joaquin, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
     3. Jane Wallace (ID:I31434),   b. 1810, Blount, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1849, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
     4. Sarah Wallace (ID:I31435),   b. 1812, Blount, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1851, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 39 years)
     5. James Brice Wallace (ID:I31436),   b. 1815, Clinton, Anderson, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1852, Randolph, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     6. Elizabeth Caroline Wallace (ID:I31439),   b. 9 Nov 1818, Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Nov 1892, Canton, McPherson, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)
     7. Matthias Turner Wallace (ID:I31437),   b. 29 Mar 1821, Maryville, Blount, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 May 1909, Ringwood, Major, Oklahoma, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)
     8. Robert Biers Wallace (ID:I32383),   b. 13 May 1823, Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Nov 1917, Canon City, Fremont, Colorado, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)

    Parents

    Family ID: F23768 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father William Wallace (ID:I27373),   b. 12 Jan 1787, Union, South Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Jan 1823, Blount, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Mother Mary Ann Nesbitt (ID:I31606),   b. 11 Feb 1787, Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1852, Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Married 2 May 1804  [6, 7

    Family

    Family ID: F19278  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Wife Martha Jane Jones (ID:I27202),   b. 30 Oct 1820, Rural, Middlesboro, Bell, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1882, West Benton, Benton, Butler, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Married 10 May 1836  Huntsville, Randolph, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Reference Number 49696 
    Children 
      1. Julia Ann Wallace (ID:I5030),   b. 27 Jul 1837, Randolph, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Feb 1872, Bartlett, Fremont, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 34 years)
      2. Thomas Jefferson Wallace (ID:I7392),   b. 9 Jul 1840, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Jan 1930, Green Valley Cemetery, Furley, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
      3. Robert Jones Wallace (ID:I31440),   b. 3 May 1842, Randolph, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Sep 1916, Furley, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)
      4. Martha Paris Wallace (ID:I7429),   b. 18 Dec 1844, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jan 1916, Furley, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
      5. William Joseph Wallace (ID:I7444),   b. 17 Jun 1847, Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Mar 1946, Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 98 years)
      6. Rev. Samuel Davidson Wallace (ID:I7464),   b. 30 Aug 1849, Fox River, Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1930, Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
      7. Mary Elizabeth Wallace (ID:I7489),   b. 29 Dec 1851, Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Sep 1901, Benton, Butler, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years)
      8. Alpharetta Jane Wallace (ID:I5010),   b. 14 Oct 1854, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1898, Uniontown, Bourbon, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)
      9. Sarah Eudora Wallace (ID:I31428),   b. 18 Aug 1859, Unionville, Putnam, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1912, Wichita, Sedgwick, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 52 years)
      10. Minerva Louisa Wallace (ID:I31430),   b. 4 Oct 1861, Unionville, Putnam, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Mar 1897, Butler, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)

    Other Personal Events

    Occupation Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Minister of the Presbyterian Church 
    Reference Number 5082 
    Residence 1850  Fox River, Davis, Iowa, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Residence 1860  Union City, Putnam, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence Post Office: Unionville 
    Namesake named after his father's brother-in-law William Donaldson 
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsBorn - 15 Jun 1816 - Blount, Tennessee, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 10 May 1836 - Huntsville, Randolph, Missouri, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1850 - Fox River, Davis, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Union City, Putnam, Missouri, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 3 Mar 1871 - Bourbon, Kansas, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mason Cemetery, Petersburg, Bourbon, Kansas, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - - Davis, Iowa, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
  • Headstones
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    Wallace Rev William Headstone
    from findagrave.com

  • Source Citations

    1. [S641] Family Trees and Records, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA, Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members;), Ancestry Family Tree.
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=74876469&pid=80

    2. [S1009] 1850 United States Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Fox, Davis, Iowa; Roll: 182; Page: 280B.
      1850 United States Federal Census
      1850 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1850; Census Place: Fox, Davis, Iowa; Roll: 182; Page: 280B


    3. [S517] Missouri, Marriage Records, 1805-present, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;).

    4. [S997] 1860 United States Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Union, Putnam, Missouri; Page: 471; Family History Library Film: 803641.
      1860 United States Federal Census
      1860 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1860; Census Place: Union, Putnam, Missouri; Page: 471; Family History Library Film: 803641


    5. [S1251] Find A Grave, Rev William Donaldson Wallace.
      https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/35446174/william-donaldson-wallace
      Wallace Rev William Headstone
      Wallace Rev William Headstone
      Wallace Rev William Headstone
      Wallace Rev William Headstone
      from findagrave.com


    6. [S1125] Notes of Wallace Family, Family info of William Wallace (d. 1823), submitted by John Schmeeckle.
      William Wallace was born in South Carolina (per the 1880 Davis Co., Iowa census record of his daughter Elizabeth, which gives her mother’s birthplace as Ireland).

      William Wallace married Mary Ann Nesbitt, presumably around 1805. Mary Ann Nesbitt was born about 1787 in Ireland (as shown in her 1850 census entry at Davis Co., Iowa). She came to America at the age of three with her parents.[1] According to the Wallace Family Genealogy by Mrs. Glen E. Rush, Mary Ann Nesbitt was the daughter of John and Mary (Gibson) Nesbitt.

      John and Mary (Gibson) Nesbitt are also identified as the parents of Margaret Nesbitt, who married Matthias Turner and lived in Rutherford County, North Carolina before moving to Randolph Co., Missouri.[2] William Wallace and Mary Ann Nesbitt named a son Matthias Turner Wallace.

      The second son of William Wallace, named John, was born about 1809 in South Carolina (per John’s entry in the 1860 census in Davis Co., Iowa).

      William Wallace obtained land in Blount County, Tennessee in 1809, as is shown by the following deed (information provided by Jackie Barnes):

      The State of Tennessee #793
      To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting
      Know ye that in pursuance of an act of the General Assembly passed on the 23 day of November 1809, there is granted by the said state of Tennessee unto William Wallace a certain tract or parcel of land containing Four hundred thirty seven acres two (rood) and eight chain, within the tract locate for the use after (demied), lying in the County of Blount and district South of French Broad and Holston on the waters of Pistol Creek. There being due and chargable on said land, the sum of four hundred and thirty-seven dollars and sixty cents with the interest due thereon.
      Beginning at a stake in the road from Maryville to Knoxville Corner to David Caldwell and running with King and Montgomery and Daniel Owens, north sixty six and a fourth west thirty chain and twenty five links to a stake north forty one west forty eight chain thirty links to a pile of stone north ten and an half cast with David Owen and D. Eagleton, fifty five chain to a small hickory. Then with Eagleton, noth thirty two west, sixty eight chain to a post oak. North twenty three east, forty six chain to a post oak and a black oak. South twenty eight east fifty five chains and eighteen links to a post oak and a hickory. Then with David Ogleby, South eighty eight and a half east, thirty five chain and forty eight links to a post oak and a black oak. South twenty seven an half three forths west, eighteen chain and forty two links to a small black oak. South twenty eight east, fifty five chains and eighteen links to a post oak and hickory. Then with David Caldwell, south forty four and an half west, one hundred and five chain and thirty six links to the beginning.
      Surveyed July 17, 1809 with its appurtencnces, to have and to hold, the said tract or parcel of land and to appurtencnces to have and to hold to the said William Wallace and his heirs and assigns forever. In witness where of, Willie Blount, Governor of the State of Tennessee has here unto set his hand and can ( ) the Great seal of the State to be offisced at Knoxville on the fifth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand and Eight Hundred and Ten, and of the American Independance, the thirty fourth
      By the Governor Willie Blount
      W. F. Blount, secretary

      According to their 1850 census entries, William’s daughter Sarah was born about 1812 in North Carolina; William’s son James was born about 1814 in North Carolina, and his son William Donaldson was born about 1816 in Tennessee. So it appears that William Wallace bought land in Tennessee in 1809 (perhaps after receiving an inheritance from his presumed father who died in 1807) and then lived in North Carolina for several years, before moving to Tennessee around 1815.

      According to Mrs. Glen E. Rush’s Wallace Family Genealogy (p. 9), William Wallace “died of a fever at his home, fourteen miles east of Knoxville, in January, 1823, and is buried in the little cemetery near his house.” The following record of inventory of his property, dated 30 Dec. 1823, was provided by Jackie Barnes:

      An Inventory of the property of William Wallace - deceased. Three head of horses, four head of grown cattle and five head of sheep, seven head of hogs, 2 shovel ploughs and one bare shovel, two pair of drawing chains and harness, one chopping ax, one iron wedge, 3 weeding hoes, 1 mans saddle, 3 beds and furniture, 1 cotton wheel and 1 flax wheel, 3 pots and 2 ovens, 2 pails, 1 churn, 1 dozen of pewter plated and one pewter dish, 5 Delf plates, 1 set of knives and forks, 6 tin cups, 4 chairs, 4 earthen crocks, 1 coffee pot, 1 slate, 1 looking glass, 1 iron potrack, 2 pair of pot hooks, 1 pair fir shovels and tongs.
      Recorded December 30th day 1823 her mark
      Mary X Wallace

      Mrs. Glen E. Rush’s Wallace Family Genealogy states on page 9: “The mother, Mary Nesbitt-Wallace and her children, after his death, continued to live at the old home for several years, and she was finally persuaded by her husband’s brother, Uncle Joseph and his wife, Aunt Polly, to go with them to Randolph county, Missouri, where a number of the relatives had already gone….A few years later they moved to Davis County, Iowa where she finally died of Consumption and is laid to rest in Southern Davis County.”

      It would appear that “Uncle Joseph” was really the eldest son of William Wallace, and not William’s brother Joseph, who lived in South Carolina.

      William and Mary Ann Wallace recorded their family tree in the names of their children:
      --The first child Joseph was named for William’s father (and brother).
      --The second child John Nesbitt Wallace was named for Mary Ann’s father.
      --The third child Jane was named for William’s mother.
      --The fourth child Sarah has the same name as William’s sister who married William Donaldson.
      --The fifth child James B. has the same name as William’s brother. What does the “B” stand for?
      --The sixth child William Donaldson Wallace was given the name of William’s brother-in-law William Donaldson.
      --The seventh child Elizabeth was named for (?)
      --The eighth child Matthias Turner Wallace was named for Mary Ann’s brother-in-law Matthias Turner.
      --The ninth child Robert Biers Wallace was named for (?)

      Children:
      i. Joseph, b. c. 1806; m. Polly Harlin 14 Dec. 1826 Fayetteville, Lincoln Co., Tenn.;
      d. 18 Apr. 1843 Sugar Creek Twp., Randolph Co., Mo.; son Isaac m. Mary Jones,
      dau. of Robert and Martha (Gash) Jones.
      ii. John Nesbitt, b. 28 Sept. 1808; m. Sarah Hamilton 6 Jan. 1829 Tenn.; to Randolph
      Co., Mo. 1832; Platte Co., Mo. 1850; Davis Co., IA 1860; to California 1864; d. 7
      July 1883 Stockton, Ca. (per history written by Benjamin Carpenter Wallace).
      iii. Jane, b. c. 1810; m. Wiley Benson; d. 1849 on way to California.
      iv. Sarah, b. c. 1812; m. Peter Vines; in Randolph Co., Mo. 1843; in Crawford Co., AR 1850.
      v. James B., b. c. 1814 N.C. (per 1850 census); m. Malinda Jones (sister of Martin
      Jones, husband of James’s sister Elizabeth) Feb. 1834 at Howard Co., Missouri
      (per Elmer Jones);in 1840 census Randolph Co., Mo.; in 1850 census Macon Co.,
      Mo. d. 1852, probate Randolph Co.
      vi. William Donaldson, b. 15 June 1816; m. Martha Jane Jones.
      vii. Elizabeth, b. 9 Nov. 1818; m. Martin Mitchell Jones 8 Feb. 1836 Huntsville, Mo.;
      d. 7 Nov. 1892 at Canton, Kansas. Her 1880 census record (Fox River Twp.,
      Davis Co., Iowa) states that her father was born in South Carolina and her mother
      was born in Ireland. (Dates per Elmer Jones)
      viii. Matthias Turner, b. 29 Mar. 1821 (per Rush); m. (1) Emmaranda Liggett 24 Sept.
      1844 at Platte Co., Mo.; m. (2) Martha A. Crawford 2 Dec. 1858 at Putnam Co.,
      Mo.; d. 26 May 1909 near Ringwood, Ok.
      ix. Robert Biers, b. 13 May 1823; m. Minerva C. Jones (sister of Robert’s brother
      William's wife) in 1845; in 1852 from Davis Co. to Taylor Co, Iowa; to Bedford, Iowa
      1873; to Little River, Rice Co., Kansas 1880; later to Canon City, Col, where
      Robert died 23 Nov. 1917.(Rush, p. 99)

      [1]Per the biographical sketch of Samuel Bowers, who married her granddaughter, in the Portrait and Biographical Album of Sedgwick County, Kansas (1888), pp. 829-30.

      [2]See http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/TURNER/2005-10/1130779197 (relating to the Turner DNA project) and http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/s/p/e/Jane-Spencer-KS/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0782.html (for Matthias Turner and descendants, with a list of sources).

      https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/tree/26769747/person/1959422169/media/5ce8294c-2033-4e55-b218-70f92fb5f0bd?destTreeId=167934432&destPersonId=102175022339&_phsrc=WRS5&_phstart=default

    7. [S1125] Notes of Wallace Family, Ancestral Memories: William Wallace and Mary Nesbitt Posted 30 Apr 2019 by John Schmeeckle.
      Ancestral Memories: William Wallace and Mary Nesbitt
      Posted 30 Apr 2019 by John Schmeeckle
      Ancestral Memories: William Wallace and Mary Nesbitt
      recorded by John Schmeeckle

      NOTE: I typed the following as my ancestors 'spoke.' An explanation of communicating with ancestors is at the end. The stories of William and Mary's son William and his daughter Julia are attached to their own profiles, as is the story of Mary's father and the stories of the Wallace ancestors for many generations. According to the ancestors, this branch of the Wallace family descends from a son of John Walays in Ferguslie, who in turn descends (through the Stewart Dukes of Albany) from King James II of Scotland.

      William Wallace
      (Apr. 11, 2019) William Wallace left the village where he was born. William understood that his father had to leave. William left, instead. This allowed his father to continue. William had to wonder at this. The father had other sons. William was not allowed to return. William paid for something that his father did not do. William had to think of this as unjust. William had to accept this as an alternative to all of the Wallaces being forced to leave.
      William had to think, after he was forced to leave, that there was a way to accept what happened. William understood that the family must pay. William knew that a son leaving was sufficient. William had to accept that there was not enough for all the sons. William was the son. William had to accept that William and no other son was chosen. William had to think, because his father did not choose, someone wanted to make a choice. William did not think of this until after. William was able to think, his eldest brother was married. William also had to think, William was married. William had to think, his younger brother was not married. IF William was allowed to stay, his brother would leave. Either the elder or the younger. The elder was married to a woman from a family that was involved in the discussion. The younger, not being married, would not suffer the loss of the family of the wife. William was the logical choice. William did not like this thought. William could not think in this way until William had left and stopped feeling angry.
      (Apr. 12, 2019) William Wallace needed to find enough. William had a young family. William had to think of the future. William had a good name. William had to think of being a leader. William had to think of being able to make his own way. William had to take the risk of moving to the frontier. William did this. William received land. William began. William was cut down.
      William Wallace did not think that Tennessee would have any problem. William had to think, because of what happened, William was not in danger. William left. This was the price. William had to think. The community insisted that Wallace sacrifice a son. That meant that people wanted Wallace to not be too strong. William had three sons. William might have more. William had to think, the community prevented Wallace from having more than enough.
      (Apr. 15, 2019) William thought, because of the situation, the community thought to make Wallace smaller. This was the real reason. Wallace was having too many sons. Other families understood. Wallace with many sons had a military force. This had to be stopped. William was the one who had to leave.
      (Apr. 18, 20190 William was able. William was not. William met his end in a battle. The battle was not a recognized battle. The family of the neighbor decided that Wallace was at fault. The neighbor insisted on changing the boundary. William understood that the sheriff understood that the boundary was correct. The family of the neighbor decided that Wallace was new. That meant, the boundary was not correct. The neighbor moved the boulder. Wallace returned. The neighbor attacked. Wallace had three men. The neighbor had four. The neighbor was victorious. Wallace was no more.

      Mary
      (Apr. 18, 2019) Mary Ann was the daughter of John Nesbitt. Mary Ann was not. Mary Ann knew, because of her father, that Mary Ann did not have a mother.
      (Apr. 24, 2019) Mary was always Mary. Mary knew, Ann could be used. Sometimes Mary was Mary Ann. Mary had a feeling when Mary was hoping to be a wife. Mary had this feeling three times. Each time Mary had a thought. The first thought was that Mary would have a descendant who was not a good man. Mary was disappointed.
      (Apr. 25, 2019) Mary had a good husband. Mary lost her husband. Mary had several sons. Mary had no need to marry. Mary did not think of remarrying.

      (Apr. 27, 2019) Mary had no interest in looking. There was no reason. A husband would demand. A son would respect. Mary was able. Mary continued to cook. The daughter decided. Mary assisted. This was as it should be.

      APPENDIX: Communicating with Ancestors
      I began communicating with deceased ancestors, and recording their stories, over two years ago (in November 2016), after I was told that this was possible. When recording the stories of distant German ancestors, I "heard" their thoughts in plain English. However, at times there was confusion about the proper choice of a word. When that happens, the ancestor and I agree on the particular word to use, and then I put parentheses around the word in question, and then the ancestor moves on with his/her story.

      Humans have a natural ability to communicate with deceased ancestors. In some countries this ability is taken for granted, but in “modern” western society, this ability has been largely lost.

      Here is my ancestor Anschetil d’Harcourt’s explanation of how he learned to communicate with ancestors: “When my grandfather died, I was young. I was sad because I wanted to be close to him. I asked how I could talk to him. My father said: Think of your grandfather. Words will appear. That is your grandfather.”

      On Aug. 26, 2018, my ancestor Tobey Mathew (an early bishop in the Church of England) further explained:
      Quote:

      "Bishop Tobey Mathews is speaking, if that is the correct word. Bishop Tobey Mathews will simply refer to himself as Bishop. Bishop understood, before he died, that he would be able to communicate with descendants. Bishop understood that descendants would have the choice. Bishop also understood that he had the choice to communicate with ancestors. Bishop knew, from an early age, that he could communicate with his mother. This was because his mother died when he was three years old. Bishop understood, because of this experience, that there was a clear reason for this. Children who lost the parents had the ability to continue in their time of need. Bishop never thought beyond this. Bishop simply understood that this was common. Bishop understood, because of his role in the Church, that Bishop had to accept the accepted teaching on this. This was simple: The ability existed, so God must have had a reason."
      Deceased ancestors appear unanimous in stating that, upon death, a separation of the soul into two parts occurs. As my recently-deceased father explained on Dec. 3, 2018, three days after his death:
      Quote:

      "Roger knew, as Roger died, that there would be a change. Roger remembered hearing that there was a separation. Roger experienced this separation. Roger knew to expect it. Roger also knew, because of his training, that it is best to simply accept. Roger did not fight. The separation took place. Roger experienced a flash of memories. Things in Roger’s life that Roger did not have any recollection of went through Roger’s mind. Roger does not think that these memories still exist. Roger is certain that aspects of his life are no longer available. Much of Roger’s intellectual interest is simply not available. This suggests that the purpose of what Roger is in now is not related. Roger hopes that, as Roger experiences what he is experiencing, John will continue to make notes."

      When I was told that it is possible to communicate with deceased ancestors, I was cautioned to always have a respectful attitude when talking to them. I decided to try it and see what happened, and it worked.

      On the “Day of the Dead” (the day after Halloween) in 2016, I thought of the names of all of my grandparents and their parents and grandparents, and they started talking to me. (I made detailed notes.) Remorse came up immediately for some of them. I learned that women often had ongoing connections with living daughters and granddaughters, but most of the men had been isolated since their deaths. I was told – several times – that after death there is a kind of separation of what we call the soul into two parts. Each ancestor has a part that remains accessible to descendants, and a part that goes elsewhere. Memories are incomplete.

      Ancestors want to see the well-being of their descendants. Ancestors also want to be able to talk to their own parents and children. Ancestors hope that living descendants will work their way back from their parents or grandparents to more distant ancestors, one generation at a time. This allows children and parents among the ancestors to talk to each other, when a living descendant is open to ancestral communication.

      Ancestors want to avoid hearing from descendants who just want to ask questions about the family tree. Ancestors may not communicate with descendants with only this in mind. For this reason, it is once again a good idea to work your back from one generation to the next. Ancestors believe that descendants who are respectful will be pleased to talk about their own lives. Ancestors want their descendants to live will, and ancestors are concerned when descendants are struggling. Ancestors have the ability to observe the lives of living descendants, but they often do not do so. Ancestors may be inclined to be more observant after a descendant contacts an ancestor, especially if that ancestor had not had any communication with descendants before.

      Some ancestors, especially those who were devoutly religious, may avoid communicating with descendants who don’t share their moral values.

      Husbands and wives who didn’t get along with each other may be able to begin to communicate about issues that they never talked about before death.

      One final point – I have heard some disturbing stories from ancestors, and proper respect demands that the ancestor be asked for permission before sharing such stories.

      William Wallace notes
      John Schmeeckle
      John Schmeeckle originally shared this on 22 Feb 2013
      Linked To
      William Wallace
      Save to my tree
      Saved by (10 of 28)
      Saved by
      camillerogers
      Saved by
      wallacerl_1
      Saved by
      sargentbaer
      Saved by
      Alicia Duran
      Saved by
      leeparks70
      Saved by
      Trudy11251
      Saved by
      genealogymoma1971
      Saved by
      cnskid
      Saved by
      Michael Wallace
      Saved by
      Dufekgirl1
      Comments