William Arthur Tinney

William Arthur Tinney

Male 1806 - 1888  (82 years)
Person ID: I5107 


Personal Information    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All
  • Name William Arthur Tinney  [1, 2
    Notes 
    • [TinneyFamilyMeredithTinney.FTW]

      Published in Historical souvenir to commemorate the dedication of the New Tazewell County Court House ,Pekin Illinois,June 21st,1916,page 18.
      Co.G. fourth Il. Volunteers,in the Mexican War, a Tazewell County Command, returned to Pekin on June 7th, 1847, after an active service of one year under Gen. Winfield Scott. Out of a full company, three died in hospital, one died of wounds received at Cerro Gordo. First Lieut. Knott died of yellow fever, and his remains were brought home for burial. Ten were discharged for disability, one left sick in hospital and one deserted.

      Edward Jones, was Captain
      Leonard A. Knott, 1st Lieut
      WILLIAM A. TINNEY, 2nd Lieut
      Benj. F. Perry, 3rd Lieut
      John M. Gill, 1st Sergt
      John W. Page, 2nd Sergt
      Saml Rhoads, 3rd Sergt
      Jesse A. Nason, 1st Corpl
      Richard S. Updyke, 2nd Corpl
      Wm. W. Moore, 3rd Corpl.
      Joseph Turner, Musician.

      BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF WILIAM A. TINNEY

      Lieutenant WILliam A. TINNEY, proprietor of the Tazewell House, Pekin, was born in Petersburg, VA.,
      on the 31st of March, 1806. He is the fourth child of Nathanial Tinney and Caroline Marshall, his wife. Nathaniel Tinney was also a native of the "Old Dominion." and during the revolutionary war, he served as a soldier, participating in many hard fought battles of that eventful struggle. The war over and peace
      secured, he returned home, and was soon after married to Miss Marshall. The Marshalls were one of the old and respected families of Virginia. Mrs. Tinney was a niece of that eminent jurist, Chief Justice Marshall, of the Supreme Court of the United States. Nathaniel Tinney emigrated with his family from Virginia, to Washington County, Kentucky, when his son, William A., was an infant. He located at Springfield, where he followed his trade, that of bricklayer. In the year 1808 he commenced the erection of the St. Rose Chapel, which is a large and elegantly constructed Catholic Cathedral. Mr. Tinney's death occurred in 1818. Mrs. Tinney survived the death of her husband many years. She became a resident of Tazewell County, Illinois. She died at the residence of her son William, in 1848. The reader will observe that by the death of his father, the subject of our biography was thrown upon his own resources at the early age of twelve years. His opportunities for education were very limited, as there was no school nearer his home than three miles, and among the playmates of Mr. Tinney, was Abraham Lincoln. When about fourteen years of age he became an apprentice to learn the saddle and harness making trade, which business he followed about fifteen years, in various places. In 1828 he went to the then village of St. Louis, where he worked at his trade for about six months. On the 6th of April, 1830, Mr. Tinney was married to Miss Sarah Jane Yeager, the daughter of Josiah H. Yeager, Hardin county, Kentucky. Mrs. Tinney is a relative of the justly celebrated Hardin family, of Kentucky. She is a niece of Benjamin Hardin, who was one of the foremost lawyers of Kentucky. In 1832 Mr. Tiney started with his youthful bride, in a gig, or one horse carriage, for Illinois. They were accompanied by the parents of Mrs. Tinney. After encountering the hardships incident to such a journey, they in due time landed in Tazewell County, and in November of the above year made a settlement at Hollins' Grove, (now Washington, Tazewell County). There he resumed his trade, which he carried on a short time, when he was elected constable, which office consumed most of his time for about two years, at which period he was appointed by Sheriff Alfred Phillips, as one of his deputies. He rode in that capacity two years more, and in 1836 we find Mr. Tinney was elected sheriff of Tazewell County. As an officer, he gave such excellent satisfaction that the people reelected him to the same office in 1838. In 1840 he was again a candidate, but was beaten in the well known Coon Skin campaign. During his official term the county seat was located at Tremont, where he resided from 1836 to 1840, at which time he returned to his old place at Washington, where he sold goods and kept hotel for six years: Being a fluent talker and a good judge of the value of property, he turned his attention to auctioneering, and operated in that capacity for about twenty years, in addition to attending to his other varied interests. He was considered the best salesman on such occasions, in central Illinois. It is said that he has frequently rode as far as fifty miles to attend a public sale.

      On the breaking out of the war with Mexico, he promptly enrolled himself as a volunteer, and was sworn in on the 9th June, 1846. Soon after he was elected second lieutenant of company C, 4th regiment Illinois volunteers. Said regiment was commanded by that gallant soldier, Col. Edward Baker (who was killed during the late civil war at the battle of Ball's Bluff). After being mustered into the service they were ordered to the heat of war. The principal battles which Lieut. Tinney participated in, were those of Vera Cruz and Cerro Cordo. He was by the side of Gen. Shields when he was wounded at the latter battle. Lieut. Tinney, though surrounded almost by the enemy, and under range of his seating fire, with intrepid coolness and bravery caught the falling General in his arms, and quickly bore him out of danger. It is to be remembered that this gallant feat was performed in the thickest of the fight. After being in the service twelve months, the regiment was ordered to New Orleans, and was there mustered out by Gen. Caines, after which Mr. Tinney returned home, and spent about one year at Washington, and in 1848 he settled permanently in Pekin, which has continued to be his home. Here he opened the well and favorably known Taylor House. After a time he purchased the Eagle Hotel, which he kept until it burned down. We copy the following from the Pekin directory:

      The year 1848 witnessed the establishment of two 'first class' hotels. The taylor House was presided over by William A. Tinney. The manner of welcoming guests to these hotels, was somewhat peculiar, as the following instance will illustrate. A traveler came off a boat one day, and went to the Eagle Hotel. There had been a little western 'scrimmage at the 'Eagle' the night before. The proprietor, Seth Kinman, who afterwards acquired considerable celebrity as a hunter and trapper in the far west, and by presenting buck-horn and bear-claw chairs, of his own make, to Presidents Lincoln and Johnson, was sitting in front of the door playing his favorite tune, the Arkansas Traveler, with the greatest self-satisfaction. The stranger, stopping, said to Seth,'Are you the proprietor here?' Seth, without resting his bow, replied. 'Well I recon I be, stranger 'Do you keep tavern?' 'Of course I do keep tavern like h--ll,' said Seth, fiddling away with all his might; 'Just pile in, hang your freight up on the floor, and make yourself at home. The boys,' continued Seth, 'have been having a little fun but if there's a whole table or plate in the house, I'll get you some cold hash towards Night The stranger didn't like the place, and took his departure, leaving the 'proprietor still enjoying his violin. Late in the afternoon the stranger presented himself at the 'Taylor House." Squire Tinney met him outside with his most austere expression, and 'Good morning--good morning sir. Walk in, sir. Take a seat, sir; shave you as soon as the water gets Warm The stranger not requiring the services of a barber, walked off in haste and amazement, and the Squire swore audibly that he was some infernal Yankee, come out west to steal honest people's money. The next steamboat that come along found our discomfited traveler on the beach awaiting passage for anywhere out of Pekin."

      On the burning of the Eagle Hotel, Mr. Tinney suffered a severe loss, losing most of his property. After the burning of his hotel he rode as town constable until 1859, when he purchased the Tazewell House, which is by far the most commodious and best kept house in the city. Mr. Tinney has, for the past ten years, served as justice of the peace, and about four years ago he was elected police magistrate of the city. His sound judgment and practical common sense eminently qualify him for that position. Early in life identified himself with the democratic party, and has strenuously adhered to the same. His first vote for President was cast for Andrew Jackson, in1828. Since then he has never missed voting at any presidential election. He says he never scratched a ticket in his life. He never would countenance that class of men who tried to break up the democratic party. He is independent, plain, open and emphatic, in giving his views on any point. In 1840 he was appointed during the administration of Van Buren, to take the census of Tazewell county, and twenty years afterward, in 1860, he was appointed to take the census for the same county. Mr. Tinney, though considerably past three score years in age, yet retains almost the activity of boyhood, of both mind and body. He presents in the leading characteristics; a
      thorough representative of Kentucky.

      William A. Tinney Listed in the 1830 United States Federal Census page 279,State Kentucky,county Mead, City of Brandenburg Wm A Tinneyof20&under30)Female of(15&under 20)

      1850 U S Census, Pekin Illinois, Tazewell Co December 1850
      William A Tinney-----44-----M----Hotel Keeper----$500----Va Note;This places William in Va.
      Jane-------------------------34-----F------------------------------------- -----Ky and being born in 1806
      Richard--------------------08-----M--------------------------------------- --Illinois[RouxModified.FTW]

      Indentured at age 17 to learn "art and mysteries of saddlecap and harness maker"

      Held position of Constable and Sheriff in Tazewell County, Illinois, for 6 years.

      William ArthurTinney organized, with Edward Jones, Company G, 4th Illinois Volunteers. As 2nd Lt. distinguished himself at the battle of Cerro Gordo in the Mexican America War, saving General Shields when he was shot through the chest by carrying him to safety.

      At the battle of Cerro Gordo, when the battle was going against Gen. Santa Anna, the Mexican general's carriage was hooked up to a couple of mules. Santa Anna had, a few years before, lost his leg to an artillery round. He was placed in the carriage with a bag of gold and a bag of roast chicken and his cork leg, which he used when riding a horse. An artillery round killed one of the mules while he was trying to escape. They cut the other mule loose and place Santa Anna upon it and escaped, leaving the gold, chicken and leg behind. Somehow, William Arthur got possession of the cork leg, and in 1882, he donated it to the Illinois National Guard, which still has it today. In the 1950;s the US government planned to return the leg to Mexico as a goodwill gesture, but the people of the state of Illinois said that it did not belong to the Federal government and wasn't going anywhere -- and it didn't. (story from Steve Wright)
    Born 31 Mar 1806  Petersburg, Independent Cities, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Died 8 May 1888  [2
    Buried May 1888  [1
    Siblings
     1. Mary Anne Tinney (ID:I5108),   b. 1800, Petersburg, Independent Cities, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1854, Maple, Taylor, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)
     2. Joanna Tinney (ID:I5109),   b. Abt 1803, Petersburg, Independent Cities, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. DECEASED
     3. John Marshall Tinney (ID:I5106),   b. 25 Mar 1810, Washington, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1872, Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
     4. Edward Benton Tinney (ID:I1145),   b. 12 Feb 1813, Springfield, Washington, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1903, Paradis, St Charles, Louisiana, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
     5. Margaret A. Tinney (ID:I5110),   b. Abt 1815,   d. DECEASED

    Parents

    Family ID: F485 Group Sheet  |  Family Chart  
    Father Nathaniel Tinney (ID:I5060),   b. Abt 1750,   d. Dec 1817, Washington, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 67 years) 
    Mother Caroline Marshall (ID:I5061),   b. 7 Apr 1770, Rural, Germantown, Fauquier, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1840, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married Abt 1799  [1
    Reference Number 26693 
    Notes 
    • [TinneyFamilyMeredithTinney.FTW]

      Marriage Source:(LDS IGI RECORDS)

    Family

    Family ID: F2105  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart
    Wife Sarah Jane Yager (ID:I5184),   b. Abt 1816, Hardin, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1880, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 64 years) 
    Married 6 Apr 1830  Hardin, Marshall, Kentucky, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2
    Reference Number 27373 
    Notes 
    • [TinneyFamilyMeredithTinney.FTW]

      Source:LDS IGI Records
    Children 
      1. Richard Tinney (ID:I5185),   b. 1842

    Other Personal Events

    Indenture Saddle Maker  [2
    Occupation Sheriff  [2
    Occupation 1850  Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    hotel keeper 
    Reference Number 5161 
    Residence 1850  Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Military Service 7 Jun 1847  [1
    2nd lieut.Co. G 4th Il, Vol. in the Mexican-American War 
  • Event Map

    Link to Google MapsBorn - 31 Mar 1806 - Petersburg, Independent Cities, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 6 Apr 1830 - Hardin, Marshall, Kentucky, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1850 - Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1850 - Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
  • Source Citations

    1. [S287] Family Database TinneyFamilyMeredithTinney.FTW.
      Date of Import: Jun 16, 2004

    2. [S235] Family Database RouxModified.FTW.
      Date of Import: Nov 21, 2004

    3. [S1009] 1850 United States Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois; Roll: 129; Page: 114A.
      https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/8054/images/4181046_00618
      1850 United States Federal Census
      1850 United States Federal Census
      Year: 1850; Census Place: Pekin, Tazewell, Illinois; Roll: 129; Page: 114A